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This honour roll of lost schools has been developed in accordance with the parameters detailed in What are Lost Schools?

  • Altona East Primary School

    State School 4805 opened in 1960 on a site bordered by Collins Avenue, Hearn Street and Sutton Avenue. By 1972 enrolments had reached 760. It was renamed Eastona Park Primary for a few years before being ‘merged’ with Hobsons Bay Primary in 2009. The new entity, Newport Gardens Primary, was located at the refurbished Hobsons Bay site and Eastona Park was closed. The buildings were demolished, but the Education Department decided to retain the site for “future educational purposes”. Bravo.

  • Altona Gate Primary School

    State School 4825 opened in temporary accommodation in 1960, moving to a permanent site on Blackshaws Road later that year (bordered by Misten, Glade and Rosala Avenues). Originally known as Brooklyn West, it was renamed Altona Gate Primary in the mid-1970s, by which time enrolments had exceeded 600. It was ‘merged’ with Bayside Secondary College in 2009 to form Bayside P-12 College. The Altona North campus of Bayside Secondary was refurbished to host the P-9 students, and Altona Gate was closed. The site was cleared and sold in August 2016.

  • Athlone Primary School

    State School 3623 opened in 1909, moving to a new site at 930 Drouin-Korumburra Road in 1928. The school was rebuilt in 1965. Declining enrolments led to the school’s closure at the end of 2013, and the site has been declared surplus by the Education Department.

  • Ballendella Primary School

    Bamawm East State School (SS3732) opened on Waterman Lane in 1912, with the name changed to Ballendella soon after. Serving families attracted to the newly-formed irrigation settlement near Rochester, enrolments increased steadily over the ensuing years. However, by 2005 numbers had declined to only 21, with only eight expected to remain the following year. The local community therefore decided to close the school at the end of 2005. The State Government sold the site in June 2018 ($180K).

  • Bell Park Technical School

    Bell Park Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1968, moving to new buildings on Barton Street the following year. It was amalgamated with Geelong West Technical and Bell Park High in the early 1990s to form the triple campus Western Heights Secondary College. This arrangement continued until late 2008 when the Barton campus was closed. The former Bell Park Technical site was sold to make way for Lifestyle Geelong, a housing community for the over 50s.

  • Bellfield Primary School

    State School 4656 opened on the corner of Banksia Street and Wadham Road in 1951. Enrolments reached 922 in 1958 but gradually decreased thereafter. In late 2010 it was ‘merged’ with Haig Street Primary, Olympic Village Primary and Banksia La Trobe Secondary College to form the multi-campus Charles La Trobe P-12 College. The valuable Bellfield site was closed the following year and prepared for sale. This occurred in 2013, when the Victorian Government bundled the site with Haig Street Primary and Banksia Secondary College for sale to Banyule Council for $23m. The Council then on-sold the Bellfield site for $22m to developers for the construction of 90 townhouses. In the meantime, population growth has taken off in the area.

  • Bena Primary School

    State School 3062 opened in temporary accommodation in 1890, moving into a new building on Greens Road in 1895. Enrolments peaked at 85 during the 1930s, but had declined to only 16 by 2006. The local community decided to close the school at the end of that year, and in 2011 the site was sold to private interests.

  • Benalla West Primary School

    State School 4850 opened on Clarke Street in September 1960, catering for the influx of new families moving into a new Housing Commission estate. In 2013 there was a major reorganisation of education in the district, when the dual campus Benalla Secondary College was merged with three local primary schools to form Benalla P-12 College. Benalla Primary and Benalla East Primary each became Elementary School campuses, but Benalla West Primary was closed.

  • Benambra Primary School

    Omeo Plains East State School (SS1746) opened in 1876, with the name eventually changed to Benambra. Enrolments fell to nine in 2002 and the school closed at the end of that year as further reductions were expected. The buildings remain operational however, being managed by the Benambra Neighbourhood House.

  • Bendigo North Primary School

    State School 1267 opened on the corner of Nolan and Smith Streets in 1873. Initial enrolments of 281 reflected the substantial Chinese community attracted to the goldfields. Numbers surged in the 1950s and additional buildings were added. However, they fell away thereafter, leading to the 2011 merger with Comet Hill Primary to form the dual campus Lightning Reef Primary. This was a temporary arrangement only, as the enabling ‘Regeneration Project’ involved renovation of the Comet Hill site (Holmes Road). By end 2012 all students were collocated at Holmes Road, and the former Bendigo North Primary was closed. The Nolan Street site has been cleared and declared surplus by the Education Department.

  • Bessiebelle Primary School

    Broadwater State School (SS2147) opened on School Road in 1879. It was renamed Bessiebelle in 1917. Enrolments had declined to 10 in 2005, and the local community decided to close the school at the end of that year. The Victorian Government is preparing the former school site for sale (as at November 2018).

  • Boorhaman Primary School

    State School 1996 opened at 1548 Boorhaman Road in 1877. Located in ‘Ned Kelly country’, the one-teacher school had typical enrolments of 20-25 over the years. However, numbers had dwindled to three by 2008 which led to the school’s closure at the end of that year. The Victorian Government is preparing the former school site for sale (as at November 2018).

  • Boort Primary School

    State School 1796 opened at 13 King Street in 1877. It became a Higher Elementary School in 1915, which continued until the opening of Boort High in 1963. In 2012 it merged with (the rebadged) Boort Secondary College to form Boort District P-12 School. The Secondary College campus on Malone Street was redeveloped to cater for the new entity. Boort Primary campus was closed in 2013 and the buildings were demolished in June 2017. The land is being prepared for sale by the Victorian Government (as at November 2018).

  • Boronia Technical School

    Boronia Technical School opened on a substantial Mount View Road site in 1973. In 1990 it was rebadged as Boronia Heights Secondary College. Then in 2012 it was ‘merged’ with Boronia Primary to form the dual-campus Boronia K-12 College. This arrangement only lasted a few years before consolidation on the former Boronia Primary site (Albert Avenue) occurred. The former Boronia Heights Secondary was closed and the buildings demolished. The Andrews Government approved the sale of the site in December 2015 and the land was being prepared for sale as at late 2016.

  • Brandon Park Technical School (Wheelers Hill)

    Brandon Park Technical School opened in 1971 on a site bounded by Academy and Collegium Avenues, Brandon Park Drive and Strada Crescent. Around 1990 it was rebadged as Brandon Park Secondary College, but declining enrolments led to its closure in 2003. The site was cleared and the major portion remained unused for many years. A smaller portion of the site became Monash Special Development School, which relocated from its original location in 2009. In 2014 the Napthine Government rezoned the unused portion and sold it to Ryman Healthcare, a retirement village provider. Although Monash Council had queried the Government’s decision to place a Development Plan Overlay (DPO) on the site, this was ignored by the Government prior to sale. The DPO removed residents’ rights to object to development.

  • Braybrook Primary School

    State School 1102 opened on the corner of Ballarat Road and Errol Street in 1873. Enrolments peaked at 811 in 1960 but gradually declined thereafter. At the end of 2007 it was ‘merged’ with Sunshine East Primary and Sunvale Primary to form the triple campus Sunshine Harvester Primary. The Sunshine East campus was redeveloped and during 2009 three campuses were consolidated into one. The Braybrook and Sunvale campuses were closed. The Braybrook site was cleared after an arson attack in 2010, enabling a purpose-built facility to be constructed for Rosamond Special School, which relocated in 2013.

  • Brim Primary School

    State School 2995 opened on Swann Street in 1890. Enrolments neared 100 at times, but had declined to 20 by 2000, which led to the school’s closure. The site was mostly cleared but has not been sold off. Brim itself has become a minor tourist sensation, thanks to the giant mural on the Brim Silos depicting real characters from the Wimmera. The former Brim Primary site is also proving popular, with its prominent time capsule due to be opened in 2034.

  • Bullengarook East Primary School

    State School 1947 opened on Bacchus Marsh Road in 1873. Enrolments had declined to five in 2007 which led to the school’s closure at the end of that year. In 2009 it became the secondary campus of the Sunbury and Macedon Ranges Specialist School.

  • Burbank Primary School (Reservoir)

    State School 4917 opened on Gertz Avenue in 1965. Declining enrolments led to a ‘merger’ with Keon Park Primary to form Reservoir Views Primary in 2009. Burbank Primary was closed and the site was cleared to enable a purpose-built facility to be constructed for the Northern School for Autism, which relocated in 2013.

  • Calder Rise Primary School (Keilor)

    Calder Rise Primary School opened in the mid-1970s on the then St Albans Road (now the corner of Green Gully Road and Solomon Drive). Declining enrolments led to a ‘merger’ with Keilor Downs Primary to form Keilor Views Primary in 2010. The schools were consolidated on the former Keilor Downs site (Swindon Crescent), while the former Calder Rise Primary was closed and the buildings demolished. Brimbank Council decided against purchasing the site and in 2016 the Andrews Government rezoned the land in preparation for sale.

  • Campmeadows Primary School (Broadmeadows)

    State School 4833 opened on the corner of Graham Street and Elliott Avenue in 1959. Situated in the heart of a Housing Commission estate, enrolments reached 942 by the end of that year. However, declining enrolments led to a ‘merger’ with Meadowbank Primary to form the dual-campus Meadows Primary in 2009. The Meadowbank campus was redeveloped and in early 2011 two campuses were consolidated into one. The Campmeadows site was cleared and is being prepared for sale by the State Government as at late 2016. The impetus for the merger came from the Brumby Government’s Broadmeadows Regeneration Project, whereby 17 schools in the area were to be merged down to 11. Whether this was intended to ‘improve outcomes’ or merely save money is a matter for conjecture.

  • Caramut Primary School

    State School 728 began as a Common School in 1861, moved to a new building at 11 Palmer Street in 1869, and became a State School in 1872. Enrolments reached 105 in 1970, but had declined to 20 by 2004. This led to the school being absorbed by Mortlake P-12 College in January 2005. Caramut Primary was closed and the site fell into disrepair. The site is being prepared for sale by the Victorian Government (as at November 2018).

  • Carrajung South Primary School

    State School 3304 opened on Old Carrajung Road in 1898 with 25 pupils. Declining enrolments led to the school being de-staffed at the end of 2006, and it was officially closed in 2012. Situated across the road from Carrajung South Recreation Reserve, the site has been declared surplus by the Education Department.

  • Clayton Primary School

    State School 4747 opened at 29 Browns Road in 1956. Enrolments were nearly 600 the following year, but had declined to 169 by 1996. The school was closed at the end of 2010 and the site was left to the elements. In 2014 the Napthine Government rezoned the land and sold it to Abacus Property Group, which plans to build a housing estate on the former school site. Although Monash Council had queried the Government’s decision to place a Development Plan Overlay (DPO) on the site, this was ignored by the Government prior to sale. The DPO removed residents’ rights to object to development.

  • Clayton West Primary School

    State School 4840 opened on Alvina Street, Oakleigh South in 1962. Enrolments had reached 391 by 1968. However, declining enrolments led to its absorption by Clarinda Primary in 2007, and closure. The site was cleared and left fallow for several years. In 2014 the Napthine Government rezoned the land and sold it to the Spire Group, which plans to build a townhouse estate on the former school site. Although Monash Council had queried the Government’s decision to place a Development Plan Overlay (DPO) on the site, this was ignored by the Government prior to sale. The DPO removed residents’ rights to object to development.

  • Cloverlea Primary School

    Clancy’s Cutting State School (SS3520) opened on Clancy’s Cutting Road in 1906. In 1914 the school moved to a permanent site at 501 Darnum-Allambee Road and changed its name to Cloverlea. New buildings were added in 1961 to cater for increased enrolments. However, numbers fell to only four in 2006 and the school was closed at the end of the year. The site is now in private ownership, protected by a Baw Baw Shire Council heritage overlay.

  • Colac High School

    Colac Agricultural High School opened on Murray Street in 1911. In 2008 it was ‘merged’ with Colac College (formerly Colac Technical School) to form Colac Secondary College. This was an education regeneration project, whereby a modern campus was to be built in Queen Street. The former Colac High was therefore closed and the site fell into disrepair. In March 2017 the Victorian Government announced that part of the site (including the heritage listed 1912 office) would be given to the Colac Otway Shire Council for community use. The remainder of the land has been cleared and is being prepared for sale (November 2018).

  • Commercial Road Primary School (Morwell)

    State School 2136 opened in temporary accommodation in 1879, moving to a new building on the corner of Commercial Road and Chapel Street in 1880. Additional buildings were added as enrolments grew to over 700. In 2017 the school merged with Crinigan Road Primary and Tobruk Street Primary to form Morwell Central Primary. The new entity was built in McDonald Street on the site of the former Morwell High and the three original schools were closed. The former Commercial Road Primary is now the LaTrobe Valley Flexible Learning Option (FLO), aimed at secondary students.

  • Coomoora High School (Springvale South)

    Springvale South High School opened on Coomoora Road in the mid-1970s. Within a few years it was renamed Coomoora High, and then rebadged as Coomoora Secondary College in 1990. In 2008 it was ‘merged’ with Heatherhill, Chandler and Springvale Colleges to form the multi-campus Keysborough Secondary College. However, this was a transitional arrangement only, intended to last until the Heatherhill and Chandler campuses had been refurbished. This occurred by late 2011, when four campuses became two, and the Coomoora and Springvale campuses were closed. The adjacent Keysborough Primary acquired part of the Coomoora site, with the remainder being prepared for sale by the Victorian Government (as at late 2016).

  • Corio North High School

    Corio North High School opened on Hendy Street in the late 1970s. It was rebadged as Flinders Peak Secondary College in the mid-1990s. The College was closed at the end of 2010, an early victim of a major schools restructure in the Corio-Norlane area. Eight schools were ‘merged’ into the multi-campus Northern Bay P-12 College, although by 2014 only five campuses were operational. The Flinders Peak school site was promptly cleared and remains abandoned, although the State Government announced in 2016 that it intends to put the property on the market.

  • Corio South Primary School

    State School 4927 opened on the corner of Vermont Avenue and Delaware Street in 1965. Originally known as Norlane North Primary, it was renamed Corio South by 1970, by which time enrolments had reached 1,070. In 2011 it formed part of a major schools restructure in the Corio-Norlane area, whereby eight schools were ‘merged’ into the multi-campus Northern Bay P-12 College. The Vermont Avenue campus lasted until the end of 2013 before it was closed. Following numerous arson attacks the buildings were demolished in 2015. The site remains abandoned as at late 2016, and it is unclear what the State Government intends.

  • Cressy Primary School

    State School 731 opened at 21 Yarima Road in 1912. Enrolments fell to 18 in 2003, and continued to decline until the school was closed in 2010. The site is being prepared for sale by the Victorian Government (as at November 2018).

  • Crinigan Road Primary School (Morwell)

    Maryvale Road State School (SS4692) opened in 1957, but was soon renamed Crinigan Road to avoid confusion with other new primary schools in Morwell. Both roads bordered SS4692, but 2A Crinigan Road was ultimately adopted as its official address. Enrolments soared to 825 in 1968 before stabilising at 550 with the opening of more schools. In 2017 the school merged with Commercial Road Primary and Tobruk Street Primary to form Morwell Central Primary. The new entity was built in McDonald Street on the site of the former Morwell High and the three original schools were closed. The State Government is preparing the former Crinigan Road Primary site for sale (as at November 2018).

  • Croydon North Primary School

    A pre-cursor school (SS958 Black Springs) had operated on what is now Hughes Park since 1878. But the site was inhospitable, so the school was eventually moved to the Croydon side of Brushy Creek and rebadged. Hence State School 1992 (North Croydon) opened on the Maroondah Highway in 1925. Enrolments reached 355 in 1969, but declined thereafter, ultimately leading to its absorption by Croydon Primary in 2010. Although Croydon North was closed, the buildings were retained when acquired by the Blackburn English Language School, which opened its Maroondah campus in 2012.

  • Croydon South Primary School

    State School 4890 opened on the corner of Belmont Road and Bacchus Drive in 1967. Enrolments had reached 770 by 1972. However, declining enrolments led to its absorption by Tinternvale Primary in 2009, and closure. The buildings were demolished soon after and the vacant site became the subject of a community campaign to preserve open space against development. In 2013 the Napthine Government had declared the site surplus to education requirements, which meant eventual sale. But in 2016 the Andrews Government brokered a deal with Maroondah Council, whereby two thirds of the former school site would be gifted to the community, while the remaining portion would be sold. This formed part of a complex land swap agreement between Government and Council, and showed that some bureaucrats had started to listen to the community they serve.

  • Culgoa Primary School

    Kaneira State School (SS3246) opened in temporary accommodation in 1895, but did not move to a permanent site in Barry Street until 1911. In 1929 the name was changed to Culgoa. Enrolments fell from 79 in 1928 to 19 in 2003, and continued to decline until closure late 2008. The portable classrooms were moved soon after, helping other communities to recover in the aftermath of the 2009 Black Saturday bushfires. In 2010, ACMI released a tribute documentary, ‘Remembering Culgoa Primary School’, which is readily available online.

  • Dallas Primary School

    State School 4900 opened on Kiewa Crescent in 1963. Designed to serve the nearby Housing Commission estate, enrolments reached 574 by the end of its first year. Although growth continued for several years after, enrolments eventually went into marked decline. In 2011 it was ‘merged’ with Upfield Primary to form the dual-campus Dallas Brooks Community Primary School. This arrangement lasted until 2013, when the new entity moved to new buildings on the former Upfield Secondary site, and the original schools were closed. The impetus for the merger came from the Brumby Government’s Broadmeadows Regeneration Project, whereby 17 government schools in the area were to be merged down to 11. The former Dallas Primary site was acquired by Ilim College, which opened a Boys’ campus there in 2015.

  • Dallas North Primary School

    State School 4933 opened in temporary accommodation in 1963, moving to a permanent site on Kaniva Street later that year. Enrolments boomed, reaching 1,059 within a few years, but eventually declined markedly. The school was closed at the end of 2012, to coincide with the opening of the new-look Dallas Brooks Community Primary School nearby. The former Dallas North Primary site was acquired by Sirius College, and became its sixth campus in 2015.

  • Dawes Road Primary School (Kyabram)

    State School 4866 opened in 1964 in response to overcrowding at Haslem Street Primary. Enrolments exceeded 400 by 1970, but had declined to 181 in 2009 when it was merged with Kyabram Secondary and Haslem Street Primary to form the multi campus Kyabram P-12 College. This was a temporary arrangement though, with Dawes Road ceasing to be operational in 2014. The buildings were demolished in 2016 and the site is being prepared for sale by the State Government (as at November 2018). The remaining two campuses were adjacent (Haslem and Fischer Streets) and became the focus for the College’s future.

  • Dean Primary School

    State School 87 has a rich history. It began life as Bullarook Forest Combined (Common) School in 1860, then in 1868 moved to a new site on Ballarat-Daylesford Road and was renamed Dean. It became a State School in 1873, and in 1911 the first Higher Elementary School established in Victoria. However, insufficient enrolments saw it revert to State School status in 1934. Enrolments fell to only eight in 2003, which led to the school’s closure at the end of that year. The site has National Trust heritage listing.

  • Doveton Technical School

    Doveton Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1963, moving to new buildings on Box Street (near Ficifolia Drive) the following year. The school began to admit girls from 1967, and was rebadged as Doveton Secondary College in the early 1990s. Early 2007 it formed part of the Dandenong Education Precinct Project, whereby Dandenong High, Cleeland Secondary and Doveton Secondary amalgamated to become a multi-campus institution. However, as the new entity was called Dandenong High School, the writing was on the wall for the low enrolment Doveton campus. And sure enough, it was closed at the end of 2008 and the buildings demolished. The former Doveton Technical site was sold in 2014 and a major housing estate is planned.

  • Doveton North Primary School

    State School 4921 opened on Rowan Drive in 1965. Enrolments reached 650 by 1968 and then stabilised. In 2008, a major amalgamation of schools in the Doveton area was announced, which would gradually bring four schools together: Doveton North Primary, Doveton Heights Primary, Eumemmerring Primary and Endeavour Hills Secondary College. The first stage saw Doveton North and Doveton Heights merge in late 2009 to form Doveton Primary, which was to operate from the Doveton North site. This arrangement lasted for two years while a new school was constructed on the Doveton Heights site. The second stage saw students move to the new school (known as Doveton K-9 College) for 2012, to be joined by the Eumemmerring Primary students. The final stage saw junior students from Endeavour Hills Secondary College transition for the 2013 year. Three school sites were closed as a result. The former Doveton North Primary site was sold to Ilim College in 2014, and will become its sixth campus in 2017.

  • Drummartin Primary School

    State School 1473 opened on Drummartin Road in 1874. Enrolments declined from 15 in 2012 to six in 2015, which led to the school’s closure later that year. The site is being prepared for sale by the State Government (as at November 2018).

  • Echuca High School

    Echuca High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1912, moving to a new building in Crofton Street in 1914. New buildings were added as the school grew, and enrolments reached 750 in 1970. In 2006 it was merged with Echuca Secondary College (formerly Echuca Technical) to form the dual campus Echuca College. However, this was a temporary arrangement while the Butcher Street campus underwent a major refurbishment. In 2009 Butcher Street became the sole campus, and the former Echuca High was closed. The Education Department has retained the site.

  • Endeavour Hills Secondary College

    Doveton North Technical School opened on Amalfi Drive in 1969. It was renamed Endeavour Hills Technical in 1974, then Endeavour Hills Secondary College in 1990. In 1992 it became part of the multi-campus Eumemmerring College, which lasted until an agreed disaggregation in 2008. But although it resumed as the stand alone Endeavour Hills Secondary, another amalgamation was imminent. Four schools in the Doveton area were to gradually ‘merge’: Doveton North Primary, Doveton Heights Primary, Eumemmerring Primary and Endeavour Hills Secondary College. The first stage saw Doveton North and Doveton Heights merge in late 2009 to form Doveton Primary, which was to operate from the Doveton North site. This arrangement lasted for two years while a new school was constructed on the Doveton Heights site. The second stage saw students move to the new school (known as Doveton K-9 College) for 2012, to be joined by the Eumemmerring Primary students. The final stage saw junior students from Endeavour Hills Secondary College transition for the 2013 year. Three school sites were closed as a result. The former Endeavour Hills Secondary site was cleared in 2015.

  • Erinbank High School

    Westmeadows Heights High School opened on Erinbank Crescent, near Dimboola Road, in 1978. In the mid-1980s it was renamed Erinbank High and in 1990 was rebadged as Erinbank Secondary College. In 2008 it was ‘merged’ with Hillcrest Secondary and Broadmeadows Secondary to form the multi-campus Hume Central Secondary College. The impetus for the merger came from the Brumby Government’s Broadmeadows Regeneration Project, whereby 17 government schools in the area were to be merged down to 11. Erinbank became the Town Park Senior Campus, to be fed by two junior campuses. However, the name told a story, as a new senior campus was gouged out of Broadmeadows Town Park ready to open mid-2010. The former Erinbank Secondary was closed and the site sold to Australand (now Frasers Property) to develop a housing estate.

  • Eumemmerring Primary School

    Eumemmerring Primary School opened at 58 Doveton Avenue in the mid-1970s. In 2008, a major amalgamation of schools in the Doveton area was announced, which would gradually bring four schools together: Doveton North Primary, Doveton Heights Primary, Eumemmerring Primary and Endeavour Hills Secondary College. The first stage saw Doveton North and Doveton Heights merge in late 2009 to form Doveton Primary, which was to operate from the Doveton North site. This arrangement lasted for two years while a new school was constructed on the Doveton Heights site. The second stage saw students move to the new school (known as Doveton K-9 College) for 2012, to be joined by the Eumemmerring Primary students. The final stage saw junior students from Endeavour Hills Secondary College transition for the 2013 year. Three school sites were closed as a result. The former Eumemmerring Primary site was cleared, ready for public sale in 2015.

  • Ferntree Gully High School

    Ferntree Gully High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1968, completing its move to a permanent site on the corner of Dorset Road and Alma Avenue by 1970. It was rebadged as a secondary college in 1990. Although enrolments had hit 879 in 1972, they had declined to 176 in 2006, which led to the school’s closure. The school site was retained by the State Government however, and in 2010 it was announced that the site would be the future home of Eastern Ranges School, catering for students with autism. Eastern Ranges P-12 School opened in 2013.

  • Ferntree Gully Primary School

    State School 1307 opened in the vicinity of the present-day intersection of Burwood Highway and Dorset Road in 1874. It was moved to a new school building across the road in 1883, and gradually expanded over the following decades. Consistent with growth in the area, enrolments reached 500 by 1961. However, declining enrolments led to absorption by Wattleview Primary in 2006, and closure. The State Government retained ownership of the site, with Community Housing (Vic) Ltd contracted to build a social housing estate. Completed by 2013, National Trust heritage listed sections of the original school were incorporated in the design.

  • Flora Hill Primary School

    State School 4667 opened on Ellis Street in 1952, and became a training school for Bendigo Teachers College in 1956. Enrolments fell dramatically by 2007, leading to the school’s closure at the end of that year. The remaining 105 students moved to other primary schools in Bendigo. The buildings were demolished in 2009 and the land was used to form Bendigo South East College under the Bendigo Education Plan regeneration project.

  • Geelong East Technical School

    Geelong East Technical School (SS7165) opened in temporary accommodation in 1958, moving to a permanent site on the corner of Boundary Road and Olney Avenue the following year. Initially controlled by the Gordon Institute of Technology, formal separation occurred in 1960. Enrolments had reached 670 by 1969. In the mid-1990s it was rebadged as James Harrison Secondary College, reflecting a change in Government attitudes to technical education. In 2002 declining enrolments led to its absorption by Newcomb Secondary College, and closure. The site became Australian Technical College Geelong from 2005 to 2009, a Federal Government initiative providing vocational pathways for Years 11 and 12 students. When the program ceased in 2010, the neighbouring Gordon Institute of TAFE acquired the former school site to expand its East Geelong campus.

  • Gerangamete Primary School

    State School 1243 opened on Colac-Forrest Road in 1874, was moved to Gerangamete East in 1877, only to return to the original site in 1942. Enrolments declined to 18 in 2001 and the school was closed at the end of that year.

  • Glen Devon Primary School (Werribee)

    State School 4914 opened on a site bounded by Market Road, Golden Avenue and Silver Street in 1964. Originally known as Werribee West Primary, it was renamed Glen Devon the following year. Enrolments had reached 620 by 1970. In 2011 it was ‘merged’ with Glen Orden Primary to form Wyndham Park Primary. Glen Devon was closed and the site was subjected to arson attacks and vandalism until the buildings were demolished in 2013. The State Government’s plans for the former school site were unclear as at late 2016.

  • Glengala Park Primary School

    Glengala Park Primary School opened on the corner of Ivory Court and Mounsey Street in 1976. It was renamed Sunshine West Primary in the late 1990s, only to be absorbed by Glengala Primary in 2000. The school’s closure made it possible for Sunshine Special Development School to expand its presence on the shared site.

  • Glenorchy Primary School

    State School 263 opened at 6 Briggs Street in 1875. Enrolments were 45 in 1970 but had declined to eight by 2010. The school was closed at the end of 2010, and the site is being prepared for sale by the State Government (as at November 2018).

  • Glenroy Primary School

    State School 3118 opened in leased accommodation in 1891, but it was not until 1908 that the school was able to move to a permanent site on the corner of Wheatsheaf Road and Acacia Street. A red brick building was added to the wooden structure in 1927. Enrolments reached 1,350 by 1956, courtesy of the influx of migrant families in new housing estates. New schools such as Glenroy North were opened to ease the pressure. Ironically, in late 2011 Glenroy Primary was ‘merged’ with Glenroy North Primary to form Glenroy Central Primary, according to State Government ‘regeneration of education provision’ criteria. The new entity moved to buildings hived off the Glenroy College site, thus reducing the space available to the secondary school. Glenroy Primary was closed, and the cleared site was acquired by Moreland Council in 2014. A Community Hub and district park is planned, but until then community groups can use the 1927 school building, which is heritage protected by a Moreland Council overlay.

  • Glenroy North Primary School

    State School 4782 opened on the corner of Daley Street and Cardinal Road in September 1956. Originally known as Broadmeadows South, the name was changed within months in order to avoid confusion at the local Post Office. The initial enrolment of 850 took the pressure off Glenroy Primary. Enrolments eased to 795 in 1970, but declined in the years that followed. Ironically, in late 2011 Glenroy North Primary was ‘merged’ with Glenroy Primary to form Glenroy Central Primary, according to State Government ‘regeneration of education provision’ criteria. The new entity moved to buildings hived off the Glenroy College site, thus reducing the space available to the secondary school. Glenroy North Primary was therefore closed, and became Glenroy Private College (P-12) in 2014.

  • Glenthompson Primary School

    Common School 947 opened on Memorial Drive in 1869, becoming a State School in 1872. In 1998 it was absorbed by Dunkeld Consolidated School, and remained a campus until 2012. Low enrolments led to the closure of the Glenthompson campus in 2013. Protected by a heritage overlay, the site is being prepared for sale by the State Government (as at November 2018).

  • Golden Square High School

    Golden Square High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1960, moving to new buildings on Hattam Street (corner MacDougall Road) in 1962. Initial enrolments of 285 grew to 512 by 1968. In 1978 it became a Year 7-10 feeder school to Bendigo Senior High School and in 1990 it was rebadged as a Secondary College. In 2008 it was ‘merged’ with Kangaroo Flat Secondary and Flora Hill Secondary as part of the Bendigo Education Plan regeneration project (despite healthy enrolments). Yet whereas the other two campuses were rebuilt as Crusoe College and Bendigo South East College respectively, the buildings at Hattam Street were soon demolished. The former gymnasium is now a community centre, and the remainder of the large site is being prepared for sale by the State Government (as at November 2018). Golden Square High is no more.

  • Golden Square Primary School

    State School 1189 opened at 6 Laurel Street in 1875, the successor to a series of goldfield schools dating back to 1853. It was merged with Maple Street Primary (SS5531) in 2010, temporarily retaining two campuses known as Golden Square Primary. The Laurel Street site was closed in 2014, when students collocated in new buildings at Maple Street. Although the modern school is known as ‘Golden Square Primary School’, it is located at Maple Street and bares SS5531. Accordingly, State School 1189 is closed. The valuable Laurel Street site with fine old red brick buildings is being prepared for sale by the State Government (as at November 2018).

  • Goorambat Primary School

    Goorambat Township State School (SS3123) opened in temporary accommodation in 1891 with 22 pupils. In 1908 the school moved to a new building at 21 Trewin Road. Fire destroyed the building in 1930 and it was rebuilt the following year. Enrolments increased to 42 and the word ‘Township’ was dropped from the name in 1941. Numbers declined to 19 in 1998, and continued to decline until the school was closed in 2010. The site is being prepared for sale by the State Government (as at November 2018). A commemorative plaque can be found in the former school grounds, launched by ‘Weary’ Dunlop, who was born in nearby Major Plains: “This Plaque Commemorates the Centenary of Goorambat Primary School 3123. 1891 – 1991. Unveiled by Sir E. E. Dunlop C M G. O B E.”

  • Greenslopes Primary School (Dandenong North)

    State School 4891 opened on Gloria Avenue in 1962. Enrolments sat at 695 in 1971, despite the departure of 200 students to the recently opened Wooranna Park Primary. In 2010 Greenslopes Primary was ‘merged’ with Lyndale Primary to form Lyndale Greens Primary, on the Lyndale site. Greenslopes Primary was closed and the buildings demolished. The site was acquired by the nearby Emerson School, which opened its middle campus in 2011.

  • Harrow Primary School

    State School 2049 opened in a new red-brick building on Blair Street in 1878. Enrolments were 38 in 1970 but fell to only seven in 2002, with no prospect of recovery. Hence the school council closed the school at the end of that year. The school and residence were sold to private interests. The property is protected by a West Wimmera Shire council heritage overlay, as befitting Victoria’s oldest inland town.

  • Heidelberg High School

    Heidelberg High School opened on Banksia Street near Oriel Road in 1955. In 1989 declining enrolments led to a merger with Heidelberg Technical School to form Banksia Secondary College. Separate campuses were maintained until 1991 when the former Technical School campus was closed. In 2008 Banksia Secondary merged with La Trobe Secondary to form the short-lived Banksia La Trobe Secondary College. In late 2010 this new entity was ‘merged’ with Haig Street Primary, Olympic Village Primary and Bellfield Primary to form the multi-campus Charles La Trobe P-12 College. The Banksia Secondary campus was closed the following year and the land was subdivided: part was acquired by Waratah Special Development School and the remainder was prepared for sale. This occurred in 2013, when the Victorian Government bundled the site with Haig Street Primary and Bellfield Primary for sale to Banyule Council for $23m. The former Banksia Secondary site is currently public open space.

  • Heidelberg West Primary School

    State School 4267 opened as Heidelberg West in 1925, and was renamed Haig Street Primary in the mid-1990s. In late 2010 it was ‘merged’ with Bellfield Primary, Olympic Village Primary and Banksia La Trobe Secondary College to form the multi-campus Charles La Trobe P-12 College. The valuable Haig Street site was closed the following year and prepared for sale. This occurred in 2013, when the Victorian Government bundled the site with Bellfield Primary and Banksia Secondary College for sale to Banyule Council for $23m. The Council then on-sold the Haig Street site (for $16m) to developers for the construction of over 100 townhouses. In the meantime, population growth has taken off in the area.

  • Highlands Primary School

    Fassifern State School (SS3440) opened in 1902 and was renamed Highlands in 1908. A team of draught horses was used to move the building to a new site in 1920. In 1934 the school was burned to the ground. It was rebuilt nearby, at 3025 Highlands Road (near the corner of Ghin Ghin Road). Electricity and septic toilets were not connected until 1968. Always a small school, enrolments were only 12 in 1970, and the school was ultimately closed in December 2016. The site is being prepared for sale by the State Government (as at November 2018).

  • Hill End Primary School

    State School 3054 opened on Russell’s Creek Road in 1891. The school building was moved to a new site on Paynter’s Road (near Willow Grove Road) in 1900. The school has twice been destroyed by fire: the 1939 Black Friday bushfires and a school fire in 1957. Enrolments peaked at 75 in 1939, and ranged between 30 and 40 for years thereafter. However, by 2007 numbers had declined to only 10 and the school was closed at the end of the year. The local community utilised the former school buildings for many years. In 2017 the State Government announced plans to sell the site, which led to the Hill End Community Inc launching a campaign against the decision. By late 2017 their efforts were rewarded as the Government determined that the site would remain a community facility.

  • Hopetoun Primary School

    State School 3167 opened in temporary accommodation in 1892, moving to a permanent site off Bruce Street in 1894. It became a Central School in 1937, a Higher Elementary School in 1945, and then returned to being a Primary School in 1960 with the opening of Hopetoun High. Declining enrolments led to a merger with Hopetoun Secondary College in 2012, to form the dual campus Hopetoun P-12 College. By 2016 the Dodgshun Street campus (former secondary college) had been refurbished to permit colocation of all students, and Hopetoun Primary was closed. The State Government is yet to announce what will become of the former primary school site.

  • Irrewillipe East Primary School

    State School 2357 opened in a portable building on Carlisle Road in 1881. Enrolments peaked in the low 50s in the 1950s, and the original buildings were replaced in 1961. By 2000 numbers had declined to only three and the school was closed at the end of that year. Although described as a ‘merger’ at the time, this simply meant relocating the classroom to Elliminyt Primary. The former school site is marked with a stone monument and a geocache can be located on the grounds.

  • Jacana Primary School

    State School 4839 opened on Landy Road in 1959 to cater for the families of a new Housing Commission estate. However, changing demographics saw a dramatic decrease in enrolments by the 21st Century. In 2009, it was ‘merged’ with Broadmeadows West, Meadow Fair North and Westmeadows Heights to form Broadmeadows Valley Primary School. The impetus for the merger came from the Brumby Government’s Broadmeadows Regeneration Project, whereby 17 government schools in the area were to be merged down to 11. The new entity was initially located at the former Broadmeadows West Primary (in Sorrento Street), awaiting the completion of new buildings on adjacent land in 2010. The other ‘merged’ schools were closed. The former Jacana Primary became a campus of the Northern School for Autism, which in turn became Jacana School for Autism in 2013.

  • Katamatite East Primary School

    State School 3663 opened in temporary accommodation in 1910, moving to a permanent site at 450 Katamatite East School Road in 1914. Enrolments were always low, and the school even closed between 1947 and 1949. When numbers declined to six in 2005 the school was permanently closed at the end of the year. The school building was removed soon after, and the land was sold in August 2015 for $41,000.

  • Kealba High School

    Kealba High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1970, moving to a new building on Driscolls Road (then Fox Road) later that year. Rebadged as a secondary college in 1990, its Sunshine Avenue facing land was converted into a housing estate in the late 1990s. In 2010 it was ‘merged’ with Deer Park College and Brimbank College to form the dual-campus Victorian University Secondary College. Kealba Secondary was closed and the buildings demolished soon after, following an arson attack. The State Government is currently preparing the vacant site for sale (as at late 2016).

  • Keilor Park Primary School

    Keilor Park Primary School opened at 46 Eliza Street in 1973. Declining enrolments led to the school’s closure at the end of 2008. The site was cleared a few years later and offered to Brimbank Council for purchase. However, the Council decided against acquisition, and so in 2015 the Andrews Government approved preparation for sale. Despite a community campaign for site retention in light of a population surge in the district, the Government is still preparing for sale (as of late 2016).

  • Kent Road Primary School (Hamilton)

    State School 4847 opened in 1965 to serve the needs of the newly developed Housing Commission estates in North Hamilton. Additional buildings were added as enrolments increased to 350 by 1970. However, numbers had declined to 71 by 2002, which led to a ‘merger’ with Baimbridge College the following year. The secondary college readily absorbed the primary school population, having two campuses on either side of Mt Baimbridge Road. The Kent Road school buildings were demolished to make way for new housing estates and the Hamilton Special Development School. As for Baimbridge College, it closed down its primary education program at the end of 2016, and returned to a pure Years 7-12 structure.

  • Keysborough Park Primary School

    Keysborough Park Primary School opened on Liverpool Drive, near Loxwood Avenue, in the late 1970s. Declining enrolments led to a ‘merger’ with Coomoora Primary in 2010, to form the dual-campus Keysborough Primary. This was a temporary arrangement only, while new buildings were constructed adjacent to the Coomoora campus (i.e. the former Coomoora High site). The move occurred in 2012, and the Keysborough Park campus was closed. The site was cleared following a rabbit infestation, and put up for public sale in late 2015.

  • Kingston Primary School

    State School 759 opened as a Common School in 1865, in a new red-brick building at 360 Kingston Road. Enrolments peaked at 80 in the 1920s. However, numbers had declined to seven by 2004 and the school was closed at the end of that year. It was sold by the State Government in 2006 (protected by a Hepburn Shire Council heritage overlay).

  • Lakeside High School (Reservoir)

    Lakeside High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1959, moving to a new building on Radford Road (across from Vickers Street) the following year. Enrolments stabilised at 650 around 1970. In 2010 it formed part of a transitional amalgamation with Ruthven Primary and Merrilands P-12 College. The goal was to establish two schools, William Ruthven Primary and William Ruthven Secondary, by refurbishing the Merrilands campus. William Ruthven Secondary College was ready for the 2011 year, so the Lakeside campus was closed. The site was cleared in 2013 and then became notorious for the illegal dumping of rubbish and building rubble. Darebin Council agreed to purchase a portion of the site in September 2016 with a view to creating cycling and walking tracks. The remainder of the site is still for sale.

  • Lalbert Primary School

    State School 2990 opened on Donald-Swan Hill Road in 1890. Enrolments fell to only four in 2013 and the school was closed at the end of the year. A sculpture marking the history/closure of the school was installed in Lalbert Community Park. The former school was sold for $54,000 in January 2017.

  • Lalor Park Primary School

    State School 5003 opened on Linoak Avenue in 1970, with an initial enrolment of 276. In 2010, declining enrolments led to a ‘merger’ with Lalor West Primary to form Lalor Gardens Primary. Until 2012, the new entity operated from the Linoak Avenue site, to permit the construction of new buildings on the former Lalor West site. Once ready for occupation in mid-2012, the school population moved and the former Lalor Park Primary was closed. The site was promptly cleared and sold to make way for the Lalor Park housing estate, now being developed by the Goldfield Group.

  • Laverton Primary School

    State School 2857 opened in temporary accommodation in 1887, moving to a new brick building on the corner of Kiora Street and Cameron Avenue the following year. Insufficient land for expansion led to relocation to a new school building on Epsom Street in 1951, while the original building was sold as a private dwelling. In 2009 it was ‘merged’ with Laverton Plains Primary and Laverton Secondary to form Laverton P-12 College. The new entity was located on the Laverton Secondary College site and the primary schools were closed. The former Laverton Primary site was cleared in 2010 and used as a makeshift carpark until purchased by Hobsons Bay Council in 2014. During 2016 planning has been ramped up to convert the land into a community facility. Ironically, it will join the Old Laverton School, which was acquired by Council and is now a community and arts facility.

  • Laverton Heights Primary School

    State School 4977 opened on Burnley Street in 1969, mainly catering for the children of RAAF personnel. It was renamed Laverton Plains Primary in the 1990s. In 2009 it was ‘merged’ with Laverton Plains Primary and Laverton Secondary to form Laverton P-12 College. The new entity was located on the Laverton Secondary College site and the primary schools were closed. The former Laverton Plains Primary became the main campus of the Western Autistic School in 2011.

  • Learmonth Primary School

    The original Learmonth school opened in a new brick building on High Street in 1862 near the current Uniting Church. In 1873 the Education Department received the school, which became State School 386 with enrolments around 100. Numbers declined to only two by late 2012 and the school was closed. Although declared surplus by the Education Department, the local community was consulted regarding future use of the site. Locally based manufacturer 321 Cider purchased the site in 2017 ($320K) with a view to establishing a brewing education and training facility in the former school buildings.

  • Lexton Primary School

    State School 1569 opened at 14 School Lane in 1875. Enrolments reached 93 in 1912 but had declined to 12 in 2001 and the school was closed at the end of the year. The site, featuring the original red-brick building, was rezoned residential in 2008 and sold in October 2009.

  • Mandurang South Primary School

    State School 1628 opened at 86 Mandurang South Road in 1875. Initial enrolments were 51, yet by 1970 had fallen to eight. Numbers had recovered to 20 by 2000 when the school was absorbed by Strathfieldsaye Primary and closed. In 2006 the former school site was handed to Strathfieldsaye Primary and became the Mandurang South Outdoor Education Centre.

  • Manningham Primary School (Templestowe Lower)

    State School 4940 opened on Manningham Road in 1966. Enrolments reached 850 by 1971, and it was renamed Manningham Park Primary in the mid-1990s. Declining enrolments led to its absorption by Templestowe Heights Primary in 2010, and closure. In 2011 the site became the secondary campus of Bulleen Heights School for Autism.

  • Maralinga Primary School (Keysborough)

    Chandler Park Primary School opened on Maralinga Avenue in the mid-1970s. Its name was changed to Maralinga Primary soon after, to avoid confusion with the older Chandler Primary. But in hindsight it seems an unfortunate choice of name, given that the side-effects of atomic testing at Maralinga were already well known by the 1970s. In 2010 the school was ‘merged’ with Chandler Primary to form the dual-campus Chandler Park Primary. The original name had come full circle, however this was a temporary arrangement until the Chandler campus was refurbished. Accordingly, in 2011 the Maralinga campus was closed. As at late 2016 the State Government is preparing the land for sale. Even though the unfortunate name is gone, it’s a sad story for all concerned.

  • Markwood Primary School

    Tea Garden Creek State School (SS1221) opened at 2230 Snow Road in 1872. The name was changed to Markwood in 1924. Enrolments varied with the forms of agriculture undertaken in the area, peaking at 82 in 1963. The school was closed in March 2007 when the last student left. In June 2018 the site was sold at auction for $147,500.

  • Maroondah High School (Croydon)

    Croydon West High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1965, moving to a new building on Kallay Street (now Brentnall Road) the following year. Enrolments had reached 442 by 1969. Its name was changed to Maroondah High School in 1971, and then Maroondah Secondary College in the mid-1990s. In 2012 it amalgamated with Croydon Secondary to form the dual-campus Melba College, with Brentnall Road as the senior campus (Years 10-12 only). Therefore, Maroondah Secondary is considered closed.

  • Maryborough East Primary School

    State School 2828 opened in a Henry Bastow designed building at 60 Gilles Street in 1887. Additional buildings were added as the school population increased over the years. Enrolments eventually declined but were still healthy (194) when the school was amalgamated with Maryborough Primary and Maryborough Regional College in 2005. This was the result of the opening of Maryborough Education Centre in Balaclava Road, a purpose built P-12 institution. Primary students moved into the new Centre first (2006), and both schools were closed. The former school site became the Maryborough School House Retirement Village, featuring 50 homes. The Victorian Heritage Register school building was restored and takes pride of place as the community centre for residents.

  • Maryborough High School

    Maryborough High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1912, with classes held in the Technical School. One of the first high schools opened in Victoria, the 153 students moved into a new building at 19-35 Palmerston Street in 1916. Enrolments grew to about 400 by 1960, with new buildings added over the years. In the 1990s it was merged with Maryborough Technical to form the dual campus Maryborough Regional College. In 2005 the Regional College was amalgamated with Maryborough Primary and Maryborough East Primary. This was the result of the opening of Maryborough Education Centre in Balaclava Road, a purpose built P-12 institution. Both secondary campuses moved in 2007 and were closed. The former Maryborough High site was sold and became the Havilah on Palmerston retirement village. The Victorian Heritage Register school building was restored and is now known as The High School Centre, a community facility laden with recreational and cultural services for residents.

  • Maryborough Primary School

    A Common School opened on Palmerston Street (backing on to Wellington Street) in 1864, becoming State School 404 in 1874. Enrolments peaked at around 600, and were still healthy (410) when the school was amalgamated with Maryborough East Primary and Maryborough Regional College in 2005. This was the result of the opening of Maryborough Education Centre in Balaclava Road, a purpose built P-12 institution. Primary students moved into the new Centre first (2006), and both schools were closed. The former Maryborough Primary site was sold and became the Calista Gardens housing estate. The heritage listed school building was retained as a condition of sale and has been restored.

  • Maryborough Technical School

    Maryborough Technical School began life as the School of Mines in the old Town Hall in 1889. It moved into a new building on Nolan Street in 1891 and was renamed Maryborough Technical School in 1903. In 1916 it became a Technical High School through the addition of junior forms. Following the First World War the school also became a Vocational Training Centre for Repatriated Soldiers. New buildings were added as enrolments grew over following decades, with juniors exceeding 500 in the 1950s. In the 1990s it merged with Maryborough High to form the dual campus Maryborough Regional College. In 2005 the Regional College was amalgamated with Maryborough Primary and Maryborough East Primary. This was the result of the opening of Maryborough Education Centre in Balaclava Road, a purpose built P-12 institution. Both secondary campuses moved in 2007 and were closed. The Victorian Heritage Register building is now home to the Central Goldfields Shire Council: 1889 in reverse.

  • Meadow Fair North Primary School (Broadmeadows)

    Broadmeadows North West Primary School opened on Lilliput Street in the mid-1970s, but was soon renamed Meadow Fair North Primary. In 2009, it was ‘merged’ with Broadmeadows West, Jacana and Westmeadows Heights to form Broadmeadows Valley Primary School. The impetus for the merger came from the Brumby Government’s Broadmeadows Regeneration Project, whereby 17 government schools in the area were to be merged down to 11. The new entity was initially located at the former Broadmeadows West Primary (in Sorrento Street), awaiting the completion of new buildings on adjacent land in 2010. The other ‘merged’ schools were closed. The former Meadow Fair North Primary became the Meadow Fair campus of ISIK College (now Sirius College) in 2010.

  • Merbein Primary School

    State School 3687 opened in temporary accommodation in 1911, moving to a new building at 13 Jenner Street in 1916. From 1945 until 1960 it operated as a Higher Elementary School. Enrolments had declined to 104 when the school was merged with Merbein Secondary, Merbein West Primary and Merbein South Primary to form Merbein P-10 College in 2010. The multi campus arrangement lasted until October 2012, when all primary students could be accommodated at the refurbished former Merbein Secondary School (Commercial Street). Accordingly, all three primary schools were closed. The former Merbein Primary site has been cleared and the State Government is now preparing for sale (as at November 2018).

  • Merbein South Primary School

    State School 3780 opened at 1192 Sturt Highway in 1913. Enrolments had declined to 64 when the school was merged with Merbein Secondary, Merbein Primary and Merbein West Primary to form Merbein P-10 College in 2010. The multi campus arrangement lasted until October 2012, when all primary students could be accommodated at the refurbished former Merbein Secondary School (Commercial Street). Accordingly, all three primary schools were closed. The State Government has declared the former Merbein South Primary site surplus.

  • Merbein West Primary School

    State School 3996 opened at 456 Paschendale Street in 1920. Enrolments had declined to 75 when the school was merged with Merbein Secondary, Merbein Primary and Merbein South Primary to form Merbein P-10 College in 2010. The multi campus arrangement lasted until October 2012, when all primary students could be accommodated at the refurbished former Merbein Secondary School (Commercial Street). Accordingly, all three primary schools were closed. The former Merbein West Primary site has been cleared and the State Government is now preparing for sale (as at November 2018).

  • Milleara Primary School (Avondale Heights)

    State School 4969 opened on North Road in 1967. At the end of 2010 it was absorbed by Keilor Heights Primary and closed. Embracia Communities purchased the site in 2013 and the buildings were demolished the following year. A new aged care facility is under construction and scheduled to open in 2017.

  • Monash High School (Clayton)

    Monash High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1965, moving to a new building on Duerdin Street in 1967. Its proximity to Monash University and Monash Teachers College (later Rusden) was intended for carrying out experimental projects and demonstrations. Enrolments neared 500 by 1969, and it was rebadged as a secondary college in 1990. The school was closed at the end of 2005 when enrolments had declined to 54. The buildings were demolished in 2012 and the site was eventually acquired by the Bryson Group, for construction of the two stage Uni Central Technology Park. Due for completion in 2017, CBRE has been appointed to market the various hi-tech buildings.

  • Monash Primary School (Clayton)

    State School 4951 opened on Samada Street in the mid-1970s, adjacent to the then Rusden Teachers College. Declining enrolments (down to 47) led to the school’s closure at the end of 2005, by which time Rusden was long gone. The buildings were demolished in 2012 when Monash Council approved a residential development. The new housing estate includes a new street, Old School Road, which says it all.

  • Mooroolbark Primary School

    State School 4417 opened in temporary accommodation in 1928, moving to a new building on the corner of Lincoln and Manchester Roads in 1935. Enrolments reached 820 in 1969. However, declining enrolments (down to 73) led to the school’s closure at the end of 2004. The buildings were soon demolished and the site left fallow for several years. In 2012 Three Pillars purchased the land with a view to building a new housing estate. The three stage development is now under construction.

  • Moreland City College (Coburg)

    Moreland City P-12 College opened on Urquhart Street over 1994-97, having been cobbled together from the closures of Coburg High, Preston Secondary and Coburg East Primary. Originally Coburg Teachers College, the buildings were quickly adapted for what ended up being a short-lived school. Declining enrolments brought an end to its troubled existence at the end of 2004. Yet in 2007 Coburg Senior High School had opened on the site, which in turn became the new Coburg High School in 2015.

  • Mount Moriac Primary School

    State School 1608 opened on the Princes Highway (corner Ervins Road) in 1875. The original red-brick building was replaced in 1968. Enrolments reached 49 in 1975 but had declined to 10 by 2003 when it was ‘merged’ with Moriac Primary. This actually meant absorption and closure. The school has been demolished.

  • Mudgegonga Primary School

    State School 2171 opened in 1879, on a site that proved unsuitable. In 1884 it was moved to a more suitable site on the corner of Blacks Flat Road and Myrtleford-Yackandandah Road. Enrolments declined to 10 in 2000 and the school was closed at the end of the year. The site is now a private residence, although the old school sign remains.

  • Murtoa Primary School

    State School 1549 opened in on the corner of Duncan and Degenhardt Streets in 1875. Enrolments reached 190 in 1921. However, numbers had declined to 56 by 2000 and it was merged with Murtoa Secondary College to form Murtoa P-12 College the following year. The College’s Webb Street site was refurbished to cater for P-12 and Murtoa Primary was closed. The Duncan Street buildings fell into disrepair until sold by the State Government in November 2013.

  • Narre Warren Station Primary School

    Narre Warren Station Primary School opened on Cranbourne Road in the early 1970s, near the railway station of the same name. The school was closed at the end of 2002 because it was a “poorly sited school on a major road”, and students were transferred to a new site 3 kilometres away. The new entity was Hillsmeade Primary School. As for the former school site, it is now the Vimini Drive housing estate, which is presumably a ‘poorly sited housing estate on a major road’.

  • Netherby Primary School

    Warraquil State School (SS2651) opened in temporary accommodation in 1885. The name was changed to Netherby in 1886, and the school moved to a new building at 10 School Street in 1889. The school was entirely rebuilt in 1963. Enrolments peaked at 43 but only five remained by mid-2008 when the school was closed. Both the school and residence were sold by the State Government in March 2017.

  • Norlane High School

    Norlane High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1957, moving to new buildings on Cox Road in 1959 (beside the Terminal Station). Enrolments peaked at 950 in 1965, then settled at 850 for several years. In 2011 it formed part of a major schools restructure in the Corio-Norlane area, whereby eight schools were ‘merged’ into the multi-campus Northern Bay P-12 College. But the Cox Road campus only lasted a year before it was closed. Following numerous arson and vandalism attacks the buildings were demolished in 2015. The former school site remains abandoned, although the State Government announced in 2016 that it intends to put the property on the market.

  • Nunawading Primary School

    Tunstall State School (SS4190) opened on the corner of Springvale Road and Esdale Street in 1923. Its name was changed to Nunawading State School in 1945, just as enrolments were beginning to soar. In 2010 declining enrolments led to a ‘merger’ with Springview Primary to form Whitehorse Primary. For two years the merged entity operated from the former Nunawading site, allowing time for the Springview site to be rebuilt. In 2012, the school population moved to its new buildings, and the former Nunawading Primary was closed. Most of the site was cleared in 2014 following an arson attack, although fortunately the heritage listed red-brick building survived intact. In 2015 Whitehorse Council purchased the site, and plans to establish a new community hub in coming years.

  • Oakwood Park Primary School (Noble Park)

    State School 4856 opened on Camellia Avenue in 1965. Enrolments reached 495 by 1971. In 2009 declining enrolments led to a ‘merger’ with Yarraman Park Primary to form Yarraman Oaks Primary. The merged entity was single campus, and the former Oakwood Park Primary was closed. In 2012 it became a campus of the Oakwood School for disengaged youth.

  • Ouyen Primary School

    State School 3615 opened in temporary accommodation in 1909, moving to a permanent site at 10 Hunt Street in 1911. Enrolments were 126 when it was merged with Ouyen Secondary to form Ouyen P-12 College in 2009. The new entity was dual campus until 2014 while the Fuller Street site (former Secondary) was refurbished. The school populations were brought together and the former Ouyen Primary closed. The site has been cleared and the State Government is preparing it for sale (as at November 2018).

  • Parkwood High School (Ringwood North)

    Parkwood High School opened on Old Warrandyte Road in 1979. In 1990 it was rebadged as a secondary college, and the school grounds were significantly enlarged in 2000 and again in 2009. However, declining enrolments led to the School Council voting to close their school at the end of 2012, with the 300 students forced to look elsewhere. Maroondah Council then acquired the site to relocate the North Ringwood Community House.

  • Patchewollock Group School

    State School 3973 opened in temporary accommodation in 1918, moving to a new building at 8 Algerian Street in 1927. Enrolments had declined to four by 2006 and the school closed in June. The former school building and site has been revitalised as the Patche Sunset Retreat caravan park.

  • Pembroke High School (Kilsyth)

    Pembroke High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1968, moving to new buildings at 150 Cambridge Road in 1970. Enrolments soared to 900 by 1974. Yet by 1994 declining enrolments led to a merger with Mooroolbark Technical School (Reay Road) to form the dual campus Pembroke Secondary College. Then in 1996 Mount Evelyn Secondary was added to form a three campus entity. In 2009 the State Government announced a refurbishment program for the Reay Road campus. In 2013 the new facilities were ready and the Cambridge Road campus was closed. The remaining two campuses became Yarra Hills Secondary College and the former Pembroke High was demolished. The State Government is now preparing for sale (as at November 2018).

  • Piangil Primary School

    State School 4164 opened at 41 High Street in 1923. Declining enrolments led to its closure in September 2015. The State Government is now preparing the site for sale (as at November 2018). The original school building is protected by a Swan Hill Shire Council heritage overlay.

  • Pines Forest Primary School (Frankston North)

    Frankston Forest State School (SS4872) opened on Forest Drive in 1961, to serve the families of a new Housing Commission Estate. Enrolments reached 1,030 by 1965, and its name was changed to Pines Forest Primary in the mid-1980s. In 2003, declining enrolments led to a ‘merger’ with Monterey Primary to form Mahogany Rise Primary. The merged entity was single campus, and the former Pines Forest Primary was closed. The site was cleared and sold, becoming TLC Forest Lodge Residential Aged Care in 2008.

  • Preston East Primary School

    State School 4136 opened in a red-brick Georgian Revival style building on Sylvester Grove in 1928. Years of overcrowding and expansion followed, with enrolments peaking at 1,100 in 1956. But by 2009 enrolments had declined to 103, which led to the school’s closure at the end of that year. Fortunately, the Education Department retained the heritage protected building (i.e. by a Darebin Council heritage overlay) by offering it to The Pavilion School for disengaged adolescents. Since 2010 it has been the main campus of this alternative education facility.

  • Preston Girls High School

    Preston Girls School opened in temporary accommodation in 1928, moving to a red-brick Georgian Revival style building in Cooma Street the following year. In 1949 it was rebadged as Preston Girls Secondary School and in 1958 became Preston Girls High. In 2013 the School Council decided to close the school at the end of that year, citing declining enrolments. Fortunately, the Education Department determined that the heritage protected buildings (i.e. by a Darebin Council heritage overlay) should be retained, to be reopened as a co-educational High School in the future. This was confirmed in late 2016 by an official Ministerial announcement.

  • Rainbow Primary School

    State School 3313 opened in temporary accommodation in 1898, moving to a permanent site on Bow Street (corner King Street) in 1905. From 1919 until Rainbow High opened in 1959 it operated as a Higher Elementary School. In 2011 the school collocated to new buildings at Rainbow Secondary’s Albert Street site. In 2015 a formal merger occurred, to create Rainbow P-12 College. The local community accessed Small Town Transformation funding from the State Government to convert the former primary school into ‘The Oasis: Creativity on the Fringe of the Desert’. From late 2018 The Oasis will utilise the historic building as a community and cultural hub for the region.

  • Rosewall Primary School (Corio)

    Rosewall Primary School opened on Sharland Road in the 1970s. Declining enrolments led to its absorption by Corio Primary at the end of 2008, and closure. The site was cleared and left fallow for several years. In 2016 the State Government announced its intention to put the property on the market.

  • Ruffy Primary School

    State School 2785 opened in temporary accommodation in 1886 with an enrolment of 14. The school moved to various unsuitable sites over the years, finally ‘landing’ in a new building at 27 Nolans Road in 1966. Enrolments reached 45 in 1970, but declined to only five in February 2007 and the school was closed. Strathbogie Shire Council purchased the site from the Education Department and transformed it into the Tablelands Community Centre (TCC).

  • Ruthven Primary School (Reservoir)

    State School 4956 opened on the corner of Glasgow Avenue and Wilson Boulevard in 1968. In 2010 it formed part of a transitional amalgamation with Lakeside Secondary and Merrilands P-12 College. The goal was to establish two schools, William Ruthven Primary and William Ruthven Secondary, by refurbishing the Merrilands campus. William Ruthven Primary was ready for the 2012 year, so the former Ruthven Primary campus was closed. The site was cleared in 2012 and eventually put on the market by the State Government. Darebin Council agreed to purchase the site in September 2016 with a view to creating public open space and sporting facilities.

  • St Albans Technical School

    St Albans Technical School opened on Jamieson Street in 1962. During its first decade the school acquired a reputation for academic and sporting achievement. In 1989 it was rebadged as Jamieson Park Secondary College, and in the late 1990s became Brimbank College. It merged with Deer Park College and Kealba College in 2010 to form the dual-campus Victoria University Secondary College (Kealba was closed). Whereas Deer Park became the junior campus, Brimbank became the senior campus, catering for Years 10 to 12 only. Therefore St Albans Technical can be considered closed.

  • Seymour East Primary School

    State School 4957 opened at 43 Delatite Road in 1967, serving the educational needs of a new Housing Commission estate. Initial enrolments were 286 but had declined to 146 by 2010. In July 2010 it was ‘merged’ with Seymour Technical High School, Seymour Primary and Seymour Special School to form Seymour P-12 College. In 2013 students were consolidated at the massive Stewart Street/Loco Street site, where the adjacent Seymour Technical High and Seymour Primary buildings were in the process of being refurbished. Seymour East Primary was closed and fell into disrepair until demolished in 2017. The State Government is now preparing the site for sale (as at November 2018).

  • Shady Creek Primary School

    State School 3458 opened in temporary accommodation in 1901, moving to a permanent site at 1151 Yarragon-Shady Creek Road soon after. The first school building was lost in a 1914 bushfire. Enrolments peaked at 45 in 1964, but declined to nine in 2005 and the school was closed at the end of the year. The State Government sold the site in 2016.

  • Smeaton Primary School

    State School 552 opened in a wooden building on Queen Street in 1861. A red-brick building was constructed in 1907, by which time enrolments had reached 122. When enrolments fell to only nine in 2013, the school decided to close at the end of the year. The State Government has put the property up for sale (as at late 2016).

  • Southvale Primary School (Noble Park)

    State School 4859 opened on the corner of Athol Road and Rowlands Avenue in 1967. Enrolments had reached 743 by 1971. However, in 2010 declining enrolments led to a ‘merger’ with Springvale South Primary to form the dual campus Athol Road Primary. But this was a temporary arrangement only, to allow time for the refurbishment of the Springvale South (‘West’) campus. Hence in 2012 the school was consolidated on the West campus, and the East campus (formerly Southvale) was closed. The site was heavily vandalised, necessitating demolition of the buildings. As at late 2016, the State Government is preparing the property for sale.

  • Springvale High School

    Springvale High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1954, moving to a permanent site on Sandown Road later that year. Enrolments exceeded 1,000 by 1962, but had entered a period of decline by the time it was rebadged as Springvale Secondary College in 1990. In 2008 it was ‘merged’ with Heatherhill, Chandler and Coomoora Colleges to form the multi-campus Keysborough Secondary College. However, this was a transitional arrangement only, intended to last until the Heatherhill and Chandler campuses had been refurbished. This occurred by late 2011, when four campuses became two, and the Springvale and Coomoora campuses were closed. The Springvale campus became Springvale Park Special Development School in 2013.

  • Stanley Primary School

    State School 550 opened on Beechworth-Stanley Road in 1858. It began with over 300 pupils, thanks to the gold rushes in the area. The school population steadily declined until there were no enrolments in 2013 and the school was closed. The Stanley Post Office has moved into the National Trust heritage listed building, and the former school is also available for community use.

  • Sunvale Primary School (Sunshine)

    State School 4818 opened on the corner of Neil and Service Streets in 1957. At the end of 2007 it was ‘merged’ with Sunshine East Primary and Braybrook Primary to form the triple campus Sunshine Harvester Primary. The Sunshine East campus was redeveloped and during 2009 three campuses were consolidated into one. The Sunvale and Braybrook campuses were closed. The Sunvale site was cleared and sold by the Napthine Government in 2014: the northern half to Brimbank Council and the southern half to developers. But whereas Council planned a public park, the developers intended a major residential estate. This became a political ‘football’ at the 2014 election, with the then Opposition determined to buy back the southern half to extend the proposed park. However, after winning the election the new Andrews Government did not follow through, and a residential development was approved in late 2016.

  • Swan Hill Technical School

    Swan Hill Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1961, moving to new buildings on the Murray Valley Highway (near Whittaker Street) later that year. By 1968 total enrolments exceeded 900, including apprentices. In 1993 it merged with Swan Hill High to form the dual campus Swan Hill College: the former High School in Pye Street was the senior campus and the Murray Valley Hwy site was the junior campus. By 2013 the school had consolidated at Pye Street, which featured new facilities surrounding the National Trust heritage listed 1922 building. The former Technical School was demolished.

  • Swan Marsh Primary School

    Pirron Yaloak West State School (SS3488) opened in temporary accommodation in 1903. It moved to a new building at 610 Swan Marsh Road in 1911, and in 1914 it became Swan Marsh. Enrolments had been around 60 in the early years, but by 2011 they had declined to three and the school was closed. The State Government is now preparing the site for sale (as at November 2018).

  • Tallangatta Valley Primary School

    Tallangatta Creek State School (SS2337) opened in 1881, and its name was changed to Tallangatta Valley in the early 1900s. The school building was condemned in 1915, and a new one was built at 1224 Tallangatta Creek Road. Enrolments had once sat around the 40 mark, but declined to three by 2016 and the school was closed at the end of the year. The State Government is now preparing the site for sale (as at November 2018).

  • Tatong Primary School

    State School 3006 opened on 2567 Benalla-Tatong Road in 1890. In 1995 declining enrolments in the region led to amalgamation with four other schools to form the multi-campus Peranbin Primary College (Swanpool, Strathbogie, Baddaginnie and Violet Town). However, by 2005 enrolments had declined further and the Tatong campus was closed.

  • Tatura East Primary School

    Toolamba West State School (SS1674) opened at 297 Craven Road in 1876. Its name was changed to Toolamba Central and then Tatura East in the years that followed. Enrolments declined to 10 by 2002 and the school was closed at the end of the year. The buildings fell into disrepair until sold by the State Government in January 2013 ($48,000).

  • Thornton Primary School

    State School 1371 opened in 1874 and the building was moved to 3-9 Back Eildon Road in 1923. In 1994 it was merged with Alexandra Primary and thereafter operated as an annex of the larger school. However, by 2012 enrolments had declined to only four at Thornton campus and it was closed at the end of the year. The State Government is now preparing the site for sale (as at November 2018).

  • Tobruk Street Primary School (Morwell)

    State School 4680 opened at 2-14 Tobruk Street, Morwell in 1954. The school was intended to cater for children from the new ‘Hourigan’ Housing Commission estate, and the initial enrolment was about 450. This had soared to 805 in 1968, but settled at around 500 with the opening of more local schools. In 2017 the school merged with Crinigan Road Primary and Commercial Road Primary to form Morwell Central Primary. The new entity was built in McDonald Street on the site of the former Morwell High and the three original schools were closed. The former Tobruk Street Primary site was cleared and sold to the Department of Health and Human Services in August 2017.

  • Upfield High School

    Upfield High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1966, moving to a permanent site on King Street in 1968. Enrolments exceeded 900 by 1971, and in 1990 it was rebadged as Upfield Secondary. Between 2003 and 2006 the school ‘transitioned’ to a new site several kilometres to the north, and became Roxburgh College. Post closure, the former Upfield Secondary site has had a varied history. The portion containing the school buildings was used by ISIK College (now Sirius College) as its Upfield campus for a few years from 2009. But the majority of the site was retained by the Education Department and in 2013 became home to the purpose-built Dallas Brooks Community Primary School and kindergarten.

  • Upfield Primary School

    State School 4993 opened on Ambrose Street in 1970 with 442 students. In 2011 it was ‘merged’ with Dallas Primary to form the dual-campus Dallas Brooks Community Primary School. This arrangement lasted until 2013, when the new entity moved to new buildings on the former Upfield Secondary site, and the original schools were closed. The impetus for the merger came from the Brumby Government’s Broadmeadows Regeneration Project, whereby 17 schools in the area were to be merged down to 11. The Andrews Government declared the former Upfield Primary site surplus late in 2015, and the land was being prepared for sale as of late 2016.

  • Wando Vale Primary School

    State School 3397 opened at 628 Casterton-Edenhope Road in 1906. Initial enrolments were 94, had declined to 33 by 1998, and 18 by late 2000 when the school was closed. It was sold by the State Government in September 2006 ($8,000). The former school building is protected by a Glenelg Shire heritage overlay.

  • Wangaratta Technical School

    Wangaratta Technical School opened in Docker Street in 1928 with an enrolment of 269. Significant expansion post World War ll led to the opening of a junior campus in Greta Road in 1955. Several name changes followed with the emergence of the TAFE sector, resulting in the separation of Greta Street (Wangaratta Secondary College) and Docker Street (Wangaratta TAFE) by 1990. Wangaratta Secondary was renamed Ovens College in 1999. However, by 2007 enrolments had declined to 259 and it was absorbed into Wangaratta High School (Edwards Street) as an additional campus. By 2014 the school consolidated on the refurbished Edwards Street site and the Greta Road campus was closed. In June 2018 the State Government announced that the former school site would become a drug and alcohol residential rehabilitation facility by 2021.

  • Wareek Primary School

    State School 1419 opened at 1101 Maryborough-St Arnaud Road in 1902, in a school building moved from Rathscar. Enrolments peaked at over 30 in the 1990s, but had declined to six in 2002 and the school was closed at the end of that year. The property was sold by the State Government in April 2013 ($75,000) and is now a private residence.

  • Warrenbayne Primary School

    State School 1498 opened at 15 School Road in 1875. The poor quality building was replaced in 1958. Enrolments declined to nine by 2008 and the school was closed in June 2008. The vandalised and overgrown property was sold by the State Government in August 2017 ($160,000).

  • Watchem Primary School

    State School 3224 opened at 17 Waddell Street in 1895. Enrolments reached 89 in 1920, necessitating the addition of another room. However, numbers declined to 13 in 2001 and the school was closed at the end of that year. The buildings fell into disrepair and the property was eventually sold by the State Government in September 2010 ($53,000).

  • Westmeadows Heights Primary School

    Westmeadows Heights Primary School opened on Nyora Court in the mid-1970s. In late 2008 it was abruptly closed by the State Government, and the remaining students bused to Broadmeadows West Primary. This was due to construction delays in the Brumby Government’s Broadmeadows Regeneration Project, whereby 17 government schools in the area were to be merged down to 11. Secondary students from Hume Central Secondary College were to be temporarily housed in the former primary school. In 2009 Broadmeadows West Primary also absorbed Meadow Fair North and Jacana to form Broadmeadows Valley Primary School. The former Westmeadows Heights Primary site was promptly cleared and sold to Australand (now Frasers Property) to develop a housing estate.

  • Windermere Primary School

    Burrumbeet State School (SS1856) opened at 29 Gluepot Drive in 1877, becoming known as Windermere in 1909. The school was destaffed in December 2012 as no students were enrolled for 2013. It was formally closed in March 2013. The State Government is now preparing the site for sale (as at November 2018).

  • Yan Yean Primary School

    State School 697 opened on Old Plenty Road (near Arthurs Creek Road) in 1861. Originally a Common School, it became a State School in 1873, with an enrolment of 53 pupils. The school was closed at the end of 2002, as enrolments had fallen to only 13. The school buildings were demolished, although the heritage protected School Master’s residence survived.

  • Yapeen Primary School

    Strathloddon State School (SS1903) opened on Yapeen School Lane in 1877, becoming Yapeen in 1904. Enrolments exceeded 200 in the early 1880s, but declined thereafter. Enrolments were 26 in 1998 and had declined to only two by 2010. The school was closed in July 2010 and became a campus of Castlemaine Secondary College (i.e. Nalderun service for the Aboriginal Community).

  • Yarrawonga Primary School

    State School 1819 opened on Tom Street, bounded by Hovell and Piper Streets, in 1877. Several red-brick buildings were added in the early decades to cope with increased numbers. In 1919 it became a Higher Elementary School, which continued until Yarrawonga High (Gilmore Street) opened in 1954. Although enrolments were a healthy 372 in 2009, it was merged with Yarrawonga Secondary College to form the dual campus Yarrawonga P-12 College the following year. This arrangement continued until 2018 when the refurbished Gilmore Street site was ready to house all students. Yarrawonga Primary was closed, and the future use of the Tom Street site (including heritage listed buildings) is now a hot topic in the town.

  • Youanmite Primary School

    Youanmite Township State School (SS3641) opened in temporary accommodation in 1910, moving to a permanent site on Katamatite Road in 1913. The word ‘Township’ was dropped from its name in 1919. Enrolments were 13 in 1998 but declined further and the school was closed in December 2000. The former school was sold by the State Government in May 2018.

  • Yuille Primary School (Ballarat)

    Yuille Primary School opened at 25 Gilles Street in 1981. Enrolments had declined to 63 by 2007 when it was merged with Grevillea Park Primary to form Yuille Park P-8 Community College. Students were collocated at Gillies Street for a year while the Grevillea Park site (Violet Grove) was rebuilt. In 2008 the school moved to the Violet Grove site and Yuille Primary was closed. In 2009 the site became the main campus of Ballarat Specialist School.