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This Honour Roll of lost schools has been developed in accordance with the parameters detailed in What are Lost Schools?

  • Alamein Primary School (Ashburton)

    State School 4649 opened on the corner of Alamein Avenue and Victory Boulevard in 1950. The establishment of a post-war Housing Commission estate in the area had made a new school an ‘urgent priority’, and enrolments exceeded 600 by 1956. However, dwindling numbers led to the school’s closure in 1993. The buildings were demolished to make way for a housing estate.

  • Altona North Technical School

    Altona North Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1959, moving to its permanent site on Millers Road (near Buntings Court) the following year. In 1992 a major amalgamation of schools in the area occurred, whereby Altona North Technical, Altona North High, Williamstown Technical and Paisley High merged to form the triple campus Bayside Secondary College. The unlucky fourth school was Altona North Technical, which was closed. The other three survived and are now known as Bayside P-12 College. As for the Altona North Technical site, it is now home to several entities: a Bunnings outlet, a child care centre, and a Greek Orthodox Church/community centre.

  • Amstel Primary School (Oakleigh East)

    State School 4801 opened in 1958 on the corner of Clayton and Ferntree Gully Roads. By 1968 enrolments had reached 570. The school was closed in 1993 when ‘merged’ with East Oakleigh Primary to form Amsleigh Park Primary School. The site became a housing estate with no plaque or other acknowledgement of its history.

  • Ararat Technical School

    Ararat Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1969, moving into new buildings on the corner of Gordon and Elizabeth Streets in 1972. In 1991 it ‘merged’ with Ararat High School to form the dual campus Ararat Secondary College. This arrangement lasted until August 1997 when the College consolidated on the Barkly Street site, and the former Ararat Technical School was closed. Today, the former school site is now home to KHS Contract, a civil construction company. In a nice touch, KHS retained the original buildings, which were readily adapted to suit its business requirements.

  • Ardoch High School (St Kilda East)

    Ardoch High School opened in 1977 under unusual circumstances. The Education Department purchased 53 old style apartments around Ardoch Avenue, for conversion to a 350 student school with an emphasis on disadvantaged and homeless youth. In 1988 it was merged with Windsor Technical to become the dual campus Ardoch-Windsor Secondary College. However, this only lasted until 1992, when the Ardoch campus was closed and students relocated to the Windsor campus. The buildings were added to the Victorian Heritage Register in 1993, and the apartments reverted to private ownership. The Windsor campus only lasted a few more years.

  • Aspendale Technical School

    Aspendale Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1959, moving to its permanent site on the corner of Laura and Glen Streets later that year. During the 1960s enrolments stabilised at around 750. However, declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in 1992. Although most of the site became a housing estate, Kingston City Council acquired some vital public space and established the Glen Street Reserve.

  • Avondale High School (Avondale Heights)

    Avondale High School opened on the corner of Military Road and Clarendon Street in 1972. The school was closed in 1990 and the following year reopened as the Avondale Heights campus of Kangan Batman TAFE. Today, the former school site features the Avondale Heights Community Precinct, a nursing home, and soccer grounds.

  • Ballarat North Technical School

    Ballarat North Technical School opened in temporary accommodation under the jurisdiction of the Ballarat School of Mines in 1955. The following year the school moved into its permanent home on Norman Street, near Club Crescent. In 1959 it became a separate entity and enrolments exceeded 600. Rebadged as Midlands Secondary College in the late 1980s, a few years later it formed part of a major rationalisation in the district. In 1994 it ‘merged’ with Ballarat East High and Wendouree Technical to form the multi-campus Ballarat Secondary College. However, the Midlands campus was for seniors only (Years 11 and 12) and did not last long, as the senior campus was relocated to Barkly Street for 2000. The Norman Street site was then used by Ballarat Specialist School for several years.

  • Banyule High School (Heidelberg)

    Banyule High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1961, moving into a new building bordering Warringal Park in 1963. Enrolments soared to 900 in the first decade, but by the early 1990s they had slumped. The school was closed in 1994 when ‘merged’ with Rosanna East High to create Viewbank College. Much of the former site became public open space (A J Burkitt Oval) while Viewbank College owns and operates the Banyule Theatre Complex, formerly part of Banyule High.

  • Bayview Primary School (Mount Waverley)

    State School 4752 opened on McLochlan Street in 1956. A large Housing Commission development nearby had led to the arrival of many school-aged children, and enrolments exceeded 800 by 1963. However, dwindling numbers resulted in the school’s closure in 1992, and absorption by Mount Waverley Primary. By 1996 Monash City Council had taken possession of the site. The school was demolished and replaced by a housing estate and Bayview Park, which features a plaque that acknowledges the former school.

  • Benalla High School

    Opened as a post primary school in temporary accommodation in 1912. The following year the school moved into a new building on Barkly Street, and in 1916 it was rebadged as a high school. Enrolments often exceeded 500, and new buildings were added at regular intervals to meet demand. Technical classes were offered from 1917 until Benalla Technical opened in Faithfull Street in 1962. Then in 1994 they ‘merged’ to form the dual campus Benalla Secondary College. But whereas the Faithfull Street campus catered for Years 7 to 10, the Barkly Street campus was for Years 11 to 12 only. Therefore, Benalla High can be considered closed. More recently, a ‘merger’ with three primary schools created Benalla P-12 College.

  • Bennettswood Primary School

    Kooyoongkoot State School (SS4693) opened off Glengarry Avenue in 1954, with the name changed to Bennettswood soon after. The school was part of a new education precinct that included Burwood Teachers College and Burwood High (closed 1987). Burwood Teachers College went through multiple identity changes over the years and absorbed the former Burwood High site along the way. By the early 1990s it had become a campus of Deakin University. Declining enrolments led to the closure of Bennettswood Primary in 1993 and it too was absorbed into the Deakin campus.

  • Bentleigh East Primary School

    State School 2083 opened in a two-room brick building on Centre Road in 1878. More rooms and land (to Bevis Street) were added over the decades to follow, and by 1955 enrolments had reached 845. The school was closed in 1993 and demolished after an application for heritage listing was rejected. A housing estate and service station now occupy the site. The long departed school should not be confused with the current East Bentleigh Primary School, being the rebadged Moorabbin Heights Primary School on Bignell Road.

  • Berriwillock Primary School

    State School 3250 opened in temporary accommodation in 1895, moving into a new one-room building on Woomelang Road (now McClelland Street) in 1907. Enrolments reached 95 in 1960 and a new classroom was then added. In 1994 it was ‘merged’ with Nandaly Primary, Sea Lake Primary and Sea Lake High to form Tyrrell P-12 College. The College was located in the Sutcliff Street buildings of the former Sea Lake High and the three primary schools were closed. The former Berriwillock Primary site fell into disrepair.

  • Blackburn Technical School

    Blackburn Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1959, moving into a new building on the corner of Koonung Road and Camellia Street later that year. The school was closed in 1992 and the northern portion (Camellia Street) sold off to make way for a housing estate. The southern portion, which included the school buildings, became the new home for Old Orchard Primary School in 1995. Old Orchard had previously been known as Blackburn North Primary, and moved from its Springfield Road address.

  • Blackburn South High School

    Blackburn South High School opened in 1959 in temporary accommodation, moving into a new building on Holland Road the following year. By 1968 enrolments had grown to 850. In 1989 it was merged with Burwood Heights High and Nunawading High to become a junior campus of Forest Hills Secondary College. However, the junior campuses were closed in 1997. Most of the Blackburn South High site is now the Aurora School for the Deaf, with the remainder converted to open space (Mirrabooka Reserve).

  • Bonbeach High School

    Bonbeach High School opened in 1957 in temporary accommodation, moving into a new building on Breeze Street the following year. By 1966 enrolments exceeded 1,000. The school motto (Strive) sits well with alumni including AFL great Leigh Matthews. However, declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in the early 1990s, following a brief rebadging as Bonbeach Secondary College. The site became a campus of Chisholm Institute of TAFE for several years and today is a housing estate.

  • Boronia High School

    Boronia High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1957, moving into a new building on Tormore Road later that year. By 1967 enrolments had approached 1,000. The school was rebadged as Tormore Secondary College in 1990 only to be closed at the end of 1991. The site was sold to make way for a housing estate.

  • Botanic Park Primary School (Doncaster)

    State School 5065 opened in the early 1970s on Viscount Drive. It was closed in the early 1990s to make way for the Park Hill Way housing estate.

  • Box Hill Primary School

    State School 2838 opened in 1887 on Whitehorse Road. The site proved unsuitable for growing enrolments and in 1920 was moved to a new double-storey brick building in Station Street, alongside Box Hill Gardens. Enrolments reached 946 in 1953, but had declined significantly by the mid-1990s when the school was closed. The site was sold and a new aged-care facility opened in 2000.

  • Box Hill Technical School

    Box Hill Technical School opened on Dunloe Avenue, Mont Albert North, in 1943. Enrolments had reached 636 by 1967. It became a co-educational college in 1985 upon merging with Whitehorse Girls Technical School (which closed). In 1993 it was rebadged as Box Hill Senior Secondary College, only catering for Years 11 and 12. This forced students in Years 7 to 10 to move to other schools, with Koonung Secondary College featuring prominently. Therefore, Box Hill Technical can be considered closed.

  • Brooklyn Primary School

    State School 4710 opened on Millers Road (across from Eames Avenue) in 1953. The establishment of the Brooklyn migrant hostel was the catalyst for the building of the school and the source of most of its student population. However, when the hostel closed in 1967, enrolments quickly fell away. The school was closed in the early 1990s and demolished to make way for a branch of the Driver Education Centre of Australia (DECA).

  • Brunswick High School

    Brunswick High School opened in 1964 in temporary accommodation, moving into a new building on Victoria Street in 1967. In 1993 it was merged with Brunswick Technical and Brunswick East High to form the dual campus Brunswick Secondary College. It continued as the senior campus of the new entity until late 1999 when the decision was made to consolidate Brunswick Secondary on Dawson Street. The former Brunswick High buildings became the Brunswick Business Incubator in 2002, a joint initiative of the Commonwealth Government and Moreland City Council. However, there is no plaque or marker to commemorate its education history.

  • Brunswick Primary School

    State School 1213 opened as Brunswick Central in temporary accommodation in 1873, moving into a new Albert Street building in 1877. One of the original ‘Henry Bastow schools’ built during the 1870s, it was deemed unsuitable for surging enrolments a century later. To cope with the demand, in 1972 the Victorian Government demolished the existing buildings to make way for a three-storey modern structure. However, when enrolments fell to 120 by 1996, the school was ‘merged’ with Brunswick East Primary and closed. The site became a housing estate with no plaque or marker to commemorate its history. Ironically, if the original building had survived it would have acquired heritage protection. Read more (PDF).

  • Brunswick East High School

    Opened in 1925 as Brunswick Domestic Arts School in Albert Street. In 1969 it was rebadged as Brunswick Girls High, and when boys were admitted in 1976 it became Brunswick East High School. In 1993 it was ‘merged’ with Brunswick Technical and Brunswick High to form the dual campus Brunswick Secondary College. The unlucky third school was Brunswick East High, which was closed. The site became a housing estate with no plaque or marker to commemorate its history.

  • Brunswick West Primary School

    State School 2890 opened in 1888 in Victoria Street, the only metropolitan example of the ‘Horsham type’ design, which incorporated verandas. Between 1942 and 1969 it operated as Brunswick Boys’ School, reverting to a co-educational primary school in 1970. Dwindling enrolments saw the school decommissioned in 1990, but the building was saved in 1993 following purchase at auction by a local community venture: WestWyck Pty Ltd. The site is now protected by a heritage overlay.

  • Bulla Primary School

    Bulla was an operational bluestone and timber school prior to the passing of the Education Act 1872. Located near Deep Creek it was transferred to the state system as State School 46. Listed on the Victorian Heritage Register in 1982, the address of 11 School Lane encompasses more than the school itself, including a pine plantation and suspension footbridge. Enrolments had declined to 46 in 1996 and the school was closed. The site was acquired by Sunbury Christian Community School (now Red Rock Christian College).

  • Bulleen Primary School

    State School 4869 opened in 1961 on a site bounded by Pleasant Road, Bourke Street and Grant Olson Avenue. By 1971 enrolments had reached 800, but declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in the early 1990s. It was demolished to make way for a housing estate.

  • Burwood Primary School

    Ballyshanassy School (SS461) opened in a brick single-room school in 1865, and became a State School after the passing of the Education Act 1872. Renamed Burwood State School in 1879, many distinctive additions were made to the original building over the decades that followed. Listed on the Victorian Heritage Register in 1982, the school was closed in 1992 due to declining enrolments. The heritage buildings are now used by community groups, while the remainder of the site was sold and became a housing estate.

  • Burwood Technical School

    Burwood Technical School was opened on the corner of Eley and Middleborough Roads in 1956. In the mid-1980s Burwood Technical became a campus of Burwood Secondary College (along with Burwood High). But within a couple of years it was the only campus, and in 1990 it too was closed. The former school buildings were demolished to make way for a housing estate.

  • Campbellfield Primary School

    State School 143 was located in a couple of Sydney Road (Hume Highway) sites from 1846 until 1960. Hume Highway widening works led to relocation to a new site between Gentles and Augusta Avenues in 1961. The school was closed in the mid-1990s to make way for a housing estate.

  • Chadstone High School

    Chadstone High School (SS7710) opened in temporary accommodation in 1962, moving into a new building on the corner of Rob Roy Road and Ivanhoe Grove the following year. Located in a rapidly growing area, enrolments reached 950 by 1968. Student numbers declined markedly in the 1980s, leading to the closure of the school in 1991. Most of the buildings were demolished, although the R K Senior Hall was retained as a community centre by Stonnington City Council. Today, Phoenix Park is a multi-purpose community facility and open space.

  • Cheltenham North Primary School

    State School 4763 opened on the corner of Chesterville Road and Bernard Street in 1957. The school was closed in 1993 when ‘merged’ with Cheltenham Heights Primary to form Le Page Primary School. The site was cleared to make way for a housing estate. Although Le Page Primary has a plaque to acknowledge the memory of the former school, its website claims that “the merger was a part of the State Government’s Quality Provision Strategy”. It is unfortunate that government schools felt obliged to echo the bureaucratic jargon of the Education Department.

  • Clayton Technical School

    Clayton Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1961, moving to a new building on Browns Road (near the Dandenong Highway) the following year. Nearby Monash University also opened in 1961 and many links were established over the years. By 1968 enrolments approached 800. However, changing demographics in the area led to a merger with Huntingdale Technical and Huntingdale High in the early 1990s, to form the triple campus South Oakleigh Secondary College. The triple campus model lasted only a few years though, as first the Clayton Technical site (1993) and then the Huntingdale High site (1997) were abandoned in favour of the Bakers Road campus. Clayton Technical buildings were demolished in order that the adjacent Fregon Reserve could be moved to cater for an expansion of Monash Medical Centre.

  • Clyde North Primary School

    State School 118 opened as Cranbourne National School in 1858. Four name changes later it became Clyde North in 1913. This small, rural school was located on the Berwick-Cranbourne Road and was closed in the mid-1990s. Now the area is a major growth corridor, and the new Heather Grove Primary is due to open in 2017. Ironically, Clyde North Primary was located where Heather Grove and Berwick-Cranbourne Road now intersect.

  • Coburg High School

    Opened in 1912 in temporary accommodation, Coburg was the first post primary school in Victoria. In 1916 the rebadged Coburg High School moved into a new building on Bell Street. In 1994 it was ‘merged’ with Preston Secondary College to form the short-lived Moreland City College (closed 2004). The original Bell Street building was sold to developers and demolished in 2001. It has been on-sold four times since then and remains a weed-infested eyesore, with no plaque or acknowledgement of its history.

  • Coburg Technical School

    Coburg Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1954, moving into a new building on Gaffney Street later that year. In 1990 the school was rebadged as Coburg North Secondary College but a few years later was closed and the site became a campus of John Batman College of TAFE. This was also short-lived. Today the site has become Harmony Park and the Coburg Special Development School.

  • Coburg East Primary School

    State School 4260 opened in 1926 on the corner of Nicholson and Harding Streets, in a building of Mediterranean design that was unusual for a school. By 1997, falling enrolments led to its inclusion in the ‘merger’ that had produced the short-lived Moreland City College (closed 2004). The original red-brick building was purchased by the Antonine Sisters and is now the junior campus of Antonine College. The site is protected by a heritage overlay.

  • Collingwood Primary School (Cambridge Street)

    State School 1895 opened as Oxford Street School in 1877, in one of the original Henry Bastow buildings. The need was great: 1,360 children were enrolled after five days. In 1922 it was renamed Cambridge Street Central School, reflecting a change in status. However, declining enrolments led to its closure in the mid-1990s. Protected by a Yarra City Council heritage overlay, the site became Collingwood English Language School.

  • Cooinda Primary School (Glen Waverley)

    State School 5018 opened between Elmwood Crescent and Baroda Avenue in 1972. The school closed in 1993 when ‘merged’ with Brentwood Primary to form Glen Waverley South Primary School. A housing estate known as The Quadrangle now occupies the site.

  • Coolaroo Primary School

    State School 5119 opened on Thorpdale Avenue in the mid-1970s. It was closed in the early 1990s and the site became St Mary’s Coptic Orthodox College in 1994.

  • Dandenong Technical School

    Dandenong Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1954, later moving into a new building on a site that ran between Cleeland Street and Stud Road. In the mid-1980s the transformation of the technical sector led to a sub-division of the site: the major portion (Stud Road) became Dandenong College of TAFE, while the minor portion (Cleeland Street) remained Dandenong Technical School. Renamed Dandenong Valley Secondary College in the late-1980s, it was closed altogether at the end of 1991. The buildings were demolished to cater for an expansion of the TAFE College, which today is part of Chisholm Institute.

  • Derrinallum Primary School

    State School 2050 opened in Fyans Street in 1878. The two classroom school was destroyed in the 1944 fires and rebuilt. It was ‘merged’ with Derrinallum High in 1994 to form Derrinallum P-12 College, and closed. The Fyans Street site has since been cleared.

  • Diggers Road Primary School (Werribee South)

    State School 5409 began as a junior adjunct to the nearby Werribee South (Duncans Road) school from its founding in 1927, until 1935, when it moved into a new building on Cayleys Road. It was closed in 1993 and remained vacant until acquired by Mambourin Enterprises in 1999. Mambourin operates its Adult Training and Support Service (ATSS) from the former primary school site.

  • Doncaster East Primary School

    Deep Creek State School (SS2096) was opened in 1878. The location proved problematic, so in 1886 the building was relocated to the corner of George Street and Blackburn Road. In 1893 it was renamed Doncaster East State School. By 1996 enrolments had fallen to 172 which led to a ‘merger’ with Waldau Primary School to form Doncaster Gardens Primary School. The school was closed and the site cleared to make way for a housing estate.

  • Doncaster Heights Primary School

    State School 4888 opened on Wetherby Road in 1968, and enrolments soon reached 695. Declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in the early 1990s. Within a few years it had been demolished and replaced by the Jising Court housing estate.

  • Doncaster Park Primary School

    State School 4861 opened on Stutt Avenue in 1962. Enrolments had reached 630 in 1968 but had declined to 170 by 1996. This led to the school’s closure to make way for a housing estate.

  • Donvale High School

    Donvale High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1966, moving into a new building on Springvale Road the following year. In 1989 it was amalgamated with Mitcham High and Mitcham Technical to form Mullauna College. The three campus format was short-lived however, as the former Donvale High was closed in 1995 and the former Mitcham Technical a year later. The Donvale High site was subdivided to become both the Manningham Donvale Indoor Sports Centre and the Heatherwood School for children with special needs.

  • Doutta Galla Primary School (Niddrie)

    State School 4708 opened in 1953 on a block bounded by Vaynor, Garnet, Teague and Albert Streets. Enrolments reached 664 by 1960 before gradually declining. The school was closed in the mid-1990s, with most of the site becoming the Western Autistic School. The remainder became a housing estate.

  • Doveton High School

    Doveton High School (SS7780) opened in temporary accommodation in 1960, moving into new buildings on Power Road in 1962. Enrolments grew rapidly, reaching 1,097 by 1970. The school was rebadged as Joseph Banks Secondary College in 1990, but declining enrolments led to its closure a few years later. The buildings were demolished and the site became a housing estate.

  • Doveton West Primary School

    State School 4820 opened in 1959, on a site bounded by Photinia Street, Chestnut Road and Matipo Street. Enrolments grew dramatically due to the industrial development in the area, reaching 1,054 by 1964. However, declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in December 1993. The land was sold to private interests and the school demolished. No development has occurred though: the site is overgrown and attracting the interest of local historian Michael Weichel who seeks to unearth long-buried time-capsules.

  • Eastmeadows Primary School (Broadmeadows)

    State School 4865 opened on the corner of Goulburn and Cuthbert Streets in 1960, catering for families from the nearby Migrant Hostel and Housing Commission estate. Declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in the mid-1990s, and it became the founding campus of ISIK College (now Sirius College) in 1997.

  • Eastmont Primary School (Vermont)

    State School 4789 opened on the corner of Centre and Heatherdale Roads in 1964. Enrolments reached 400 by 1969, but had declined to 140 by 1996. This led to the school’s closure to make way for a housing estate.

  • Eastmoor Primary School (Bentleigh East)

    State School 4790 opened beside King George VI Memorial Reserve on Chesterville Road in 1957. Enrolments had reached 506 by 1972. It was ‘merged’ with Tucker Road (Moorabbin) Primary in 1998 and closed. Most of the site became the Southern Autistic School, while the remainder became a housing estate.

  • Essendon Technical School

    Essendon Technical School opened in 1939 in temporary accommodation until moving into its new building later that year. Located in Buckley Street, the Percy Everett designed school pioneered a new style that influenced the Australian education sector for years to come. Fortunately, the school acquired heritage protection, courtesy of the Victorian Heritage Register and the National Trust. The school was closed in 1992 as part of a ‘merger’ with Essendon High, Niddrie High and Keilor Heights High to form Essendon Keilor College. The Essendon Technical site became a campus of Kangan Batman TAFE (now Kangan Institute).

  • Eureka Street Primary School (Ballarat East)

    State School 1071 was known as Specimen Hill when it became a Board of Education school in 1870. Located in Eureka Street near Princes Street S, in 1880 it was rebuilt in imposing red brick. A major rationalisation of schools occurred in December 1993, when Eureka Street was merged with three other schools to form Canadian Lead Primary (i.e. Golden Point, Richards Street and Millbrook). The Eureka Street and Richards Street schools were retained as campuses until the new school building opened in 1997. The Eureka Street red brick building became a private residence, while the former school grounds became a housing estate.

  • Fairfield North Primary School

    State School 4329 opened in a new red-brick building on the corner of Station and Agg Streets in 1928. It operated as a central school for a few years in the 1950s. Declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in the early 1990s. The original school building was converted to private apartments, part of the Fairfield Views housing estate.

  • Fairway Primary School (Frankston)

    State School 4830 opened on Spray Street in 1964. Enrolments had reached 316 by 1971. The school was closed in 1993 and the buildings demolished. Peninsula Health established a Community Care Unit on part of the site, while the remainder became a housing estate.

  • Fawkner Technical School

    Fawkner Technical School opened in a new building on Anderson Road in 1961. Further buildings were added over the next few years and in 1967 the school became co-educational. Fawkner Technical was part of a short-lived merger in 1993, becoming a campus of Box Forest Secondary College along with Glenroy High, Glenroy Technical, Hadfield High and Oak Park High. However, by 1995 the school had been demolished to make way for a housing estate. Indeed, the only Box Forest Secondary campus to survive was the former Glenroy Technical School, further rebadged in 2010 as Glenroy College.

  • Fawkner North Primary School

    State School 4779 opened in a new building off Baird Street in 1957. Enrolments had reached 756 by 1970, but eventually declined. The school was closed in 1993 and sold. The school buildings were retained by Darul Ulum College of Victoria which opened on the site in 1997.

  • Ferntree Gully Technical School

    Ferntree Gully Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1954, moving into a new building on the corner of Willow Road and Burwood Highway later that year. In 1990 it was rebadged as Glenfern Secondary College and a few years later became affiliated with Swinburne University. However, declining enrolments led to its closure soon after and by 1997 it had been demolished to make way for a housing estate.

  • Fitzroy High School

    Fitzroy High School opened on Falconer Street in 1957, in the red-brick building previously used for the secondary classes of Fitzroy North Central School. In 1988 the school merged with Exhibition High to form Fitzroy Secondary College. This proved short-lived however, as Fitzroy Secondary was closed in 1992. A community campaign to retain the site for education purposes followed, resulting in an arrangement whereby Kangan Batman TAFE utilised the site. Although Kangan Batman returned the site to the Education Department in 1999 it was not sold. The recently elected Bracks Government proved sympathetic to community concerns and a new Fitzroy High School opened in 2004.

  • Flemington High School

    Flemington High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1964. Towards the end of 1966 the new school building was ready, located on Epsom Road between Flemington Racecourse and the Showgrounds. Enrolments reached 900 by 1969, yet had declined significantly by the early 1990s when the school was closed. The site became the headquarters of Harness Racing Victoria.

  • Footscray High School

    Footscray High School opened in temporary accommodation in January 1954, moving into a new building on Wembley Avenue a few months later. Although the site was in Yarraville, it was officially known as Footscray High. The school was rebadged as Footscray Yarraville Secondary College in 1990, but declining enrolments led to its closure in 1996. It was sold and demolished soon after to make way for a housing estate. Among its many prominent ex-students was Lynne Kosky, a reforming Education Minister in the Bracks Labor Government elected in 1999.

  • Fyansford Primary School

    State School 1691 opened in a one-room bluestone building in 1876, located on the Hamilton Highway near the Moorabool River. It was closed in 1996 but the building survived thanks to a Heritage Overlay applied by the City of Greater Geelong. The site passed into private hands, and today is a well-known source of spare parts for Kombi vans.

  • Gardiner Primary School

    State School 3888 opened as Gardiner Central in 1915, on a site bordered by Nash and Kent Streets. The school developed a rich tradition of scholarship, supplying students to both Melbourne High and MacRobertson Girls High over the years. Many prominent Melbourne citizens began their education at Gardiner Central. However, around 1990 the Years 7 and 8 classes ceased, and in 1992 the school closed altogether. The school was demolished and by 2001 had become the Noel Miller Centre, a mecwacare aged-care facility.

  • Geelong Primary School (Swanston Street)

    State School 1094, originally known as Geelong East New Vested School, was opened in 1871. Located on Swanston Street, the original brick building was remodelled and the school expanded in 1912. After its closure in 1993, the buildings were acquired by the Geelong Hospital which transferred its psychiatric wards into the former primary school.

  • Geelong Technical School (Moorabool Street)

    Geelong Technical School opened as the junior section of the Gordon Institute of Technology in 1913. It was located across various sites until moving into a new brick building on the corner of Moorabool and Maud Streets in 1927. The administrative connection to the Gordon Institute was severed in 1962, and during the mid-1970s an annex was opened in Reynolds Road, Belmont. In 1990 the original school and the annex became the dual-campus South Barwon Secondary College. However, this arrangement did not last long, as the Moorabool Street campus was closed a few years later and the site absorbed by the Gordon Institute of TAFE. Today, the heritage listed building has become luxury apartments: The Devlin, named after the former student who designed our decimal coinage.

  • Geelong Technical School (Reynolds Road, Belmont)

    Belmont Technical School opened on the corner of Reynolds and Fryers Roads during the mid-1970s. It was conceived as an annex of Geelong Technical School. In 1990 the annex and the original school became the dual-campus South Barwon Secondary College. However, this arrangement did not last long, as the Moorabool Street campus was closed a few years later. The Reynolds Road school went it alone for a couple of years until it too was closed. In 1998 the site became Clairvaux Catholic School, reusing the buildings of the former technical school.

  • Geelong North Primary School

    State School 1889 opened as West Geelong in 1877 on a Separation Street site. Surging enrolments tested capacity, so a larger site was purchased on the corner of Melbourne Road and Bay Street. A new red-brick building was erected and the school, now known as Geelong North, moved in 1915. The school was closed in 1996 and the grounds became a housing estate. The red-brick building was protected by a council heritage overlay and survived, to be converted into apartments.

  • Glenroy High School

    Glenroy High School opened in 1954 on Hilton Street, and by 1965 had over 1,000 students. Numbers had plummeted by the early 1990s though. Glenroy High was part of a short-lived merger in 1993, becoming a campus of Box Forest Secondary College along with Fawkner Technical, Glenroy Technical, Hadfield High and Oak Park High. However, the following year the campus was closed and replaced by Koori Open Door Education (KODE) Glenroy. Indeed, the only Box Forest Secondary campus to survive was the former Glenroy Technical School, further rebadged in 2010 as Glenroy College.

  • Glen Waverley Primary School

    State School 2219, originally known as Black Flat, was opened on the corner of Springvale and Waverley Roads in 1880. The large single-room school with tiered seating was renamed Glen Waverley in 1921. Although enrolments had exceeded 1,000 in the late 1960s, by 1994 numbers had plummeted. The school was ‘merged’ with Glen Waverley Heights Primary and closed, yet the Glen Waverley name was retained for the new entity. Most of the former SS2219 site was sold to Le Pine Funerals, but the original building had National Trust heritage classification and has been retained as the Black Flat Community Centre.

  • Golden Point Primary School (Ballarat East)

    State School 1493 opened in 1875 in a new building on a site bounded by Grant, English and Dunn Streets. Although enrolments in excess of 900 occurred throughout its history, by the 1980s they were in decline. A major rationalisation of schools occurred in December 1993, when Golden Point was merged with three other schools to form Canadian Lead Primary (i.e. Eureka Street, Richards Street and Millbrook). The Eureka Street and Richards Street schools were retained as campuses until the new school building opened in 1997, while the others were closed. The former Golden Point site was retained for educational purposes though, becoming GPlace in 2008. GPlace is a community consortium of three bodies: Ballarat U3A, Mount Clear College and Ballarat Regional Multicultural Council.

  • Gowerville Primary School (Preston)

    State School 4675 opened in 1959 in buildings previously used as an annex of Preston Technical School. The site was bounded by Bell, Victoria and Neale Streets, and the school initially catered for families from the nearby Migrant Hostel. Declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in 1993. It was demolished to make way for Bell Street outlets of the Harvey Norman and Officeworks chains.

  • Greythorn High School

    Greythorn High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1958, moving into a new building on Greythorn Road (near Agnes Avenue) later that year. During the 1970s enrolments exceeded 1,000. However, enrolments declined markedly thereafter and the school was ‘merged’ with Balwyn High School from early 1992. Its function as a subsidiary campus only lasted until 1994 when the school was demolished to make way for a housing estate.

  • Grimshaw Primary School (Bundoora)

    State School 5033 opened in the early 1970s on a site bordered by Hastings Street, Trafalgar Crescent and Ellery Street. It was closed in the early 1990s and sold to make way for a housing estate.

  • Hadfield High School

    Hadfield High School opened on Boundary Road in 1964. Portable classrooms were soon required with enrolments increasing to 988 by 1969. Hadfield High was part of a short-lived merger in 1993, becoming a campus of Box Forest Secondary College along with Glenroy High, Glenroy Technical, Fawkner Technical and Oak Park High. However, by 1998 the school had been demolished to make way for Pascoe Vale Gardens Retirement Village. Indeed, the only Box Forest Secondary campus to survive was the former Glenroy Technical School, further rebadged in 2010 as Glenroy College.

  • Hadfield Primary School

    North Park State School (SS4787) opened on Exeter Street in 1957, and by 1967 enrolments had reached 780. In the mid-1970s the name was formally changed to Hadfield Primary School. Enrolments had declined to 199 by 1996 which led to the school’s closure to make way for a housing estate. It is noteworthy that many other primary schools had much smaller enrolments at the time and yet were spared.

  • Hawksburn Primary School

    State School 1467 opened in 1875 in a large gothic-style building on Malvern Road. It was known as Prahran until 1888, Prahran North until 1906, and finally Hawksburn. For most of its history the school had to cope with staggering enrolments – over 2,000 in 1888 – yet was closed in late 1993 after numbers had plummeted. The school grounds were sold off for housing while the heritage protected building became the new home for the Leonard Joel Auction House. The heritage listings are both National Trust and Victorian Heritage Register for this very significant structure.

  • Heatherdale Primary School (Mitcham)

    State School 4904 opened in a new brick building on the corner of Purches and Good Governs Streets in 1963. By 1972 enrolments had reached 600. Declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in 1993 to make way for a housing estate.

  • Heatherton Primary School

    Kingston Common School opened on what is now Old Dandenong Road (near Madden Road) in 1870. After the Education Act was passed in 1872, the school became Heatherton State School (SS938). It remained a small, rural school for much of its history. Enrolments peaked at 175 in 1993 but then plummeted. The school itself asked to be closed at the end of 1999. The building was retained and is now the Heatherton branch of Autism Spectrum Australia (ASPECT).

  • Heathmont Primary School

    State School 4688 opened in temporary accommodation in 1952, moving into a new building on the corner of Francis Street and Balfour Avenue the following year. By 1969 enrolments had reached 620, yet had fallen to 158 in 1996. Declining school enrolments in the Ringwood area led to the closure of several primary schools in 1997: Heathmont, Southwood and Ringwood. A new ‘merged’ entity – Great Ryrie Primary School – opened to replace them in 1998. The new school shared the Heathmont College senior campus (formerly Ringwood Technical). The Heathmont Primary buildings have been demolished.

  • Heidelberg Technical School

    Heidelberg Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1954, moving into a new building on the corner of Bell Street and Waterdale Road the following year. In 1989 declining enrolments led to a merger with Heidelberg High to form Banksia Secondary College. Separate campuses were maintained while the Heidelberg High site in Banksia Street was refurbished. This was completed by 1991 and the Bell Street campus was closed. Northern Melbourne Institute of TAFE (NMIT) acquired the site and its Manufacturing, Engineering and Building Industry Training Centre was opened in 1994.

  • Heidelberg Heights Primary School

    Opened as Rosanna West State School in 1957 on the corner of Dougharty Road and Helen Street. By 1960 it had been renamed Heidelberg Heights, with enrolments well over 700. However, dwindling enrolments led to the school’s closure in 1993. The site was sold and developed into an industrial estate.

  • Highett Primary School

    State School 4677 opened on Graham Road in 1953. It is difficult to imagine a more suitable site for science education, as it backed on to CSIRO. However, declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in 1993, even though a surge in pre-schooler numbers in the area had been identified. Despite community outrage the school was demolished in 1994 to make way for a housing estate.

  • Huntingdale High School

    Huntingdale High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1959, moving into its permanent site on Riley Street the following year. By 1964 enrolments had reached 941. But changing demographics in the area led to a merger with Huntingdale Technical and Clayton Technical in the early 1990s, to form the triple campus South Oakleigh Secondary College. The triple campus model lasted only a few years though, as first the Clayton Technical site (1993) and then the Huntingdale High site (1997) were abandoned in favour of the Bakers Road campus. In the late 1990s the nearby Oakleigh South Primary School (in Beryl Avenue) was successful in its application to move to the larger site formerly known as Huntingdale High.

  • Hurstbridge High School

    Hurstbridge High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1966, moving into its permanent site abutting Hurstbridge Park in 1968. In 1989 the Minister of Education directed Hurstbridge High to merge with Diamond Creek Technical, with each becoming campuses of Diamond Valley Secondary College. This arrangement continued until 1999, when the College was consolidated in the recently refurbished buildings of the former Technical School. The Hurstbridge campus was closed, and fell into disrepair. There was a silver lining though: when Hurstbridge Primary burnt down in January 2003, the former Hurstbridge High was scrubbed up to accommodate students during rebuilding.

  • Jordanville South Primary School (Chadstone)

    State School 4678 opened on the corner of Baradine and Bolwarra Streets in 1953. Enrolments reached 640 by 1970, with students coming from the Jordanville Housing Commission Estate as well as the Holmesglen Migrant Hostel. However, declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in 1993. It was sold to developers and demolished, yielding the Brindalee Mews housing estate.

  • Karingal High School (Frankston)

    Frankston East High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1959. For two years this included a Scouts Hall, Yacht Club, Life Saving Club and the rear of the Pier Hotel. In 1961 the school moved to a permanent site on Ashleigh Avenue, near Jacana Avenue, and its name was changed to Karingal High. Enrolments reached 1,000 by 1969, and in 1990 it was rebadged as a secondary college. In 1997 declining enrolments led to a ‘merger’ with Ballam Park Secondary to form the dual-campus Karingal Park Secondary College. This was a short-term arrangement though, as the school consolidated on the former Ballam Park campus in 1999 and the Ashleigh Avenue campus was closed. The former Karingal High site was cleared to make way for Regis Shelton Manor Aged Care, as well as a housing estate. The surviving campus was renamed McClelland College in 2009.

  • Keon Park Technical School (Reservoir)

    Keon Park Technical School (SS7210) opened in temporary accommodation in 1958, moving into its new building on Sturdee Street the following year. In 1990 it was renamed Keon Park Secondary College, but this was short-lived, as the school was closed in 1992. Darebin City Council established the Merrilands Community Centre on part of the site while the remainder became a housing estate.

  • Keysborough Primary School

    Keysborough Common School opened in temporary accommodation in 1869. The Education Act was passed in 1872, and State School 1013 moved into a new brick school-room at (170) Chapel Road in 1874. It remained a small, rural school for much of its history. The school was closed in the early 1990s and sold in 1994. The school building still stands amidst construction of a housing estate. The former school should not be confused with the current Keysborough Primary, which was created in 2010 through a merger of Keysborough Park Primary and Coomoora Primary.

  • Keysborough Technical School

    Keysborough Technical School opened on Henderson Road in 1974. In 1990 it was rebadged as Keysborough Secondary College. However, declining enrolments led to its closure a few years later to make way for a housing estate. The Activity Centre was retained and is now the Southern Star Badminton Centre. The former school should not be confused with the current Keysborough Secondary College, which was created in 2008 through a merger of Chandler, Heatherhill, Springvale and Coomoora.

  • Killoura Primary School (Burwood East)

    State School 5001 opened on the corner of Eley Road and Bonview Crescent in 1971. In the late 1980s a major amalgamation took place in the area, when Killoura, Warrawong, Blackburn South and Mirrabooka primary schools were merged to form the triple campus Orchard Grove Primary. Blackburn South was closed in the process. The arrangement proved to be short-lived however, with only the former Mirrabooka Primary surviving past 1991. The former Killoura Primary site became the Blackburn English Language School, with the buildings retained.

  • Kilsyth East Primary School

    School number 4998 opened in a new brick building on Edenhope Street in 1971. The school was closed in the early 1990s, sold and demolished to make way for a housing estate.

  • Kingsbury Technical School

    Kingsbury Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1963, moving into its new building on the corner of Dunne and Stymie Streets the following year. In 1992 it was merged with Reservoir High and Preston East High to become a campus of Reservoir District Secondary College. However, dwindling enrolments led to the closure of the Kingsbury campus in 1997. The school was promptly sold and demolished to make way for a housing estate.

  • Knox Technical School

    Knox Technical School (SS7216) opened in temporary accommodation in 1966. Construction issues meant that the school could not occupy its new building in Boronia Road until 1969. Rebadged as Knox Secondary College in 1990, dwindling enrolments led to its closure a few years later. The school was promptly sold and demolished to make way for a housing estate. Fortunately, neighbouring Bayswater South Primary School did not suffer the same fate.

  • Koonung Heights Primary School (Mont Albert North)

    State School 4727 opened in Belmore Road in 1954, on a site bounded by McColl Road, Sewell Street and Milne Road. By 1959 enrolments had reached 355. The school was closed in 1993 to make way for a housing estate.

  • Korong Vale Primary School

    State School 1800 opened in a single classroom in 1877. The school moved to Vernon Street in 1914 and additional rooms were added in the years that followed. In December 1999 Korong Vale Primary was ‘merged’ with Wedderburn Primary and Wedderburn High to form Wedderburn P-12 College. The new entity was located on the former High School site, and the other schools were closed. The former Korong Vale Primary site is now privately owned.

  • Lakeside Primary School (Reservoir)

    State School 4882 opened in a new building on Radford Road in 1962. It backed on to Merri Creek, which could hardly be described as a lake. Dwindling enrolments led to the school’s closure in 1993. The site was acquired by Melbourne’s Vietnamese Buddhist community and became the Linh Son Buddhist Temple.

  • La Trobe High School (Bundoora)

    Rosanna High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1958, moving into a new building on Crissane Road the following year. The name was changed in 1966 with the opening of the new La Trobe University. The school was closed in the early 1990s and the site absorbed by the University.

  • Laverton Park Primary School

    RAAF Laverton (SS4765) opened on the Base itself in 1955, exclusively for the children of Royal Australian Air Force personnel. Enrolments reached 446 by 1960, which by now included children from a new Housing Commission estate. To cope with the growing demand the school moved into new buildings on Armstrong Street the following year. By 1967 enrolments had reached 1,121, but started to decline thereafter. In the early 1980s the school was renamed Laverton Park Primary and in the early 1990s it was closed. Most of the site including the buildings became the Philippine Community Centre, while the remainder of the grounds became a housing estate. The buildings were destroyed by fire in 2015.

  • Long Gully Primary School

    State School 2120 opened in a red-brick classic on the corner of Jackson and Stanfield Streets in 1879. The building is an outstanding example of Henry Bastow design that consciously towers above the local area. Although the school was closed in 1992 it was protected by its listing on the Victorian Heritage Register. The site was acquired by the Bendigo-based training organisation CVGT Australia, and today serves as its Head Office.

  • Lovely Banks Primary School

    State School 1497 opened in temporary accommodation in 1875, moving into a new wooden building on Anakie Road in 1877. The original building was demolished and replaced in 1963. The school was closed in 1996 when ‘merged’ with Bell Post Hill Primary to form Hamlyn Banks Primary School. The Lovely Banks site was sold to private interests, and the school building is still in evidence on the corner of Anakie and Lovely Banks Roads.

  • Macleod Primary School

    State School 4246 opened in temporary accommodation in 1925, moving to a new school-house on Greensborough Road (between Cooley and Fairlie Avenues) the following year. Enrolments were small until the Watsonia Army Barracks opened across the road in 1948. However, declining enrolments led to a merger with Macleod High School in 1997 to form the P-12 Macleod College. This was located at the former High School and Macleod Primary was closed. The latter site was cleared to make way for a housing estate.

  • Maidstone Primary School

    State School 4658 opened in 1951 on a ‘prime ministerial’ site: bounded by Deakin, Scullin and Curtin Streets. Established with a new Housing Commission estate in mind, enrolments had reached 674 by 1959. However, declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in 1996. The site was cleared to make way for a housing estate.

  • Malvern Girls High School

    Malvern Girls School was opened in 1946, co-locating in the buildings of the long-established Tooronga Road Central School (SS2586), now known as Malvern Primary School. Over the following 20 years increasing enrolments saw more classrooms taken from the primary school, purpose built facilities added, and the status changed to Malvern Girls High School. The school closed in 1993 and the buildings reverted to Malvern Primary use. Some former students made their way to a new entity: Melbourne Girls’ College.

  • Maribyrnong Primary School

    State School 3736 opened in temporary accommodation in 1912, moving to a new building on the corner of Raleigh and Wests Roads in 1916. However, the Defence Department occupied the school in the early 1940s, leading to the school’s relocation to a new site on Warrs Road in 1942. In the 1970s a large shopping centre opened on the edge of the school. What became known as Highpoint Shopping Centre eventually absorbed part of the school site when it was closed in the mid-1990s. The remainder of the site became a housing estate.

  • Merlynston Primary School (Coburg North)

    State School 4328 opened in a new three-storey red-brick building on Bakers Road in 1928. It closed at the end of 1993 and a year later became the senior campus of King Khalid Islamic College (now known as Australian International Academy). Fortunately, the Academy retained the imposing red-brick building, which did not have heritage protection at the time.

  • Middlefield Primary School (Blackburn North)

    State School 4878 opened in 1962 on a site bounded by Middlefield Drive, Koonung Road and Verbena Street. By 1972 enrolments had reached 560. The school was closed in 1992 when ‘merged’ with Blackburn North Primary to form Old Orchard Primary. The site was sold to make way for a housing estate. Old Orchard Primary moved from Springfield Road to the former Blackburn Technical School site in 1995.

  • Millbrook Primary School

    State School 1972 opened in 1877 on what is now known as the Old Melbourne Road. A small, rural school, it was rebuilt in 1967. A major rationalisation of Ballarat district schools occurred in December 1993, when Millbrook was merged with three other schools to form Canadian Lead Primary (i.e. Eureka Street, Richards Street and Golden Point). The Eureka Street and Richards Street schools were retained as campuses until the new school building opened in 1997, while the others were closed. The former Millbrook school was retained as a community centre.

  • Mimosa Primary School (Glen Waverley)

    State School 5052 opened on Mimosa Street in 1972. Declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in 1994. The site was sold to make way for a housing estate.

  • Mitcham Technical School

    Mitcham Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1965, moving into new buildings on Dunlavin Road the following year. By 1969 enrolments exceeded 600. In 1989 it was amalgamated with Mitcham High and Donvale High to form Mullauna College. The three campus format was short-lived however, as the former Donvale High was closed in 1995 and the former Mitcham Technical in 1996. The Mitcham Technical site was sold off and became a housing estate.

  • Moe High School

    Moe High School opened on the corner of Lloyd Street and Truscott Road in 1953. Enrolments reached 912 in 1963, although it is doubtful that the teaching of Esperanto was the main attraction. Declining enrolments in the area led to the amalgamation of Moe High, Yallourn Technical and Newborough High in 1994 to form Lowanna College. Initially there were three campuses, with the former Yallourn Technical being the senior campus, while the former High Schools were junior campuses. By 2000 they had been consolidated on a new site in Newark Avenue and the original schools closed. The former Moe High was demolished to make way for a housing estate.

  • Monterey High School (Frankston North)

    Frankston Forest High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1966. Renamed Monterey High School, it moved into a new building on the corner of Monterey Boulevard and Forest Drive the following year. Declining enrolments led to a ‘merger’ with Monterey Technical in 1994 to form Monterey Secondary College, and Monterey High was closed. The site was sold to developers by the Kennett Government and the buildings demolished. However, it lay dormant for several years until the new Bracks Government (post 1999) compulsorily re-purchased the land and offered it to Frankston City Council without charge. The former school site is now Monterey Community Park.

  • Moorabbin West Primary School

    State School 4643 opened on Apex Avenue in 1950. Enrolments reached 700 by 1954. However, dwindling enrolments led to the school’s closure in 1993. The site was promptly sold off and became a housing estate.

  • Moorleigh High School (Bentleigh East)

    Moorleigh High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1966, moving into new buildings on Bignell Road the following year. By 1969 enrolments approached 900, but eventually declined, leading to the school’s closure in 1992. Moorabbin City Council (now Glen Eira) purchased the site, and converted it into the Moorleigh Community Village. The school buildings were retained to cater for a variety of community interests: Senior Citizens, Maternal Health, U3A, Toy Library and Art Group. The former school grounds became home to the Maccabi Tennis Club and Moorabbin Cricket Club.

  • Moreland High School

    Moreland Central School (SS4635), located on the corner of The Avenue and De Carle Street, became a High School in 1953. The school was closed in 1991 and became a campus of Kangan Batman TAFE (now Kangan Institute). Kangan Institute no longer requires the site and is negotiating its future with the Education Department. The vandalised buildings have been boarded up, with no plaque or acknowledgement of its history.

  • Mornington High School

    Mornington High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1956, moving into a new building on the corner of Nepean Highway and Wilsons Road the following year. In the mid-1990s Mornington High and Mornington Technical merged to form the dual campus Mornington Secondary College. However, the Wilsons Road (i.e. Junior) campus was closed in 1999 as the College was consolidated on the former Technical School site. The buildings were demolished and several institutions now occupy the former Mornington High site, including The Mornington Centre of Peninsula Health, and the Mornington Ballet School.

  • Mortlake Primary School

    State School 397 opened as Mortlake Common School in 1858 on Dunlop Street. The original building was replaced by a red-brick classic in 1900, and further buildings were added over the years. In 1995 it was ‘merged’ with Mortlake High to form the single campus Mortlake P-12 College. The College was consolidated on the former high school site in Hood Avenue and the National Trust listed primary school closed. It was sold in 1997 and became a private residence.

  • Murrumbeena High School

    Murrumbeena High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1958, moving into a new building on the corner of North and Murrumbeena Roads the following year. By 1963 enrolments had exceeded 1,000. In 1990 it was rebadged as Murrumbeena Secondary College. However, enrolments had declined to 316 by 1996, when it was ‘merged’ with Prahran High and Caulfield Secondary to form Glen Eira College. The school was closed and the site was sold to make way for a housing estate.

  • Nandaly Primary School

    State School 3927 opened in a one-room building on McKenzie Street in 1916, about 30 kilometres from Sea Lake. In 1994 it was ‘merged’ with Berriwillock Primary, Sea Lake Primary and Sea Lake High to form Tyrrell P-12 College. The College was located in the Sutcliff Street buildings of the former Sea Lake High and the three primary schools were closed.

  • Narmara Primary School (Burwood East)

    State School 4953 opened on the corner of Narmara Street and Highbury Road in 1968. By 1972 enrolments had reached 700. However, declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in 1992. The school was demolished and most of the site became a housing estate. Wesley Mission built the Arthur Preston Residential Services facility on the remainder.

  • Newborough High School

    Newborough High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1962, moving to a new building on Old Sale Road the following year. Enrolments reached 548 by 1969. However, declining enrolments in the area led to the amalgamation of Newborough High, Yallourn Technical and Moe High in 1994 to form Lowanna College. Initially there were three campuses, with the former Yallourn Technical being the senior campus, while the former High Schools were junior campuses. By 2000 they had been consolidated on a new site in Newark Avenue and the original schools closed. The former Newborough High site became Newborough East Primary, which relocated from its original site in 2000.

  • Newcomb South Primary School

    Newcomb South Primary School opened on Anthony Street in 1976, abutting Newcomb High. It was ‘merged’ with Newcomb Primary in 1997 to form Newcomb Park Primary. The school was closed and the site absorbed by Newcomb High, now known as Newcomb Secondary College.

  • Newlands High School (Coburg)

    Newlands High School opened in 1960 on Murray Road, the land having been hived off the grounds of Pentridge Prison. By 1962 all buildings were complete and enrolments reached 643. However, numbers eventually declined and the school was closed in December 1992. The buildings were demolished a few years later, and the land became a housing estate. Ironically, it now forms part of the Pentridge Village development.

  • Norlane Primary School

    State School 4734 opened on the corner of Thrush Street and Eagle Parade in 1955. Enrolments reached 1,300 by the early 1960s, necessitating the establishment of more schools in the area. However, plummeting enrolments led to the school’s closure in the mid-1990s. It became the Geelong campus of ISIK College (now Sirius College) from 1998 to 2011. It was then purchased by Baptcare to build a community facility.

  • Northcote Technical School

    Northcote Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1966, but was not able to move into its new buildings on Clarendon Street until 1968. In 1989 the school was renamed Darebin Parklands Secondary College as governments were taking a different view of technical education. Then in 1991 changing demographics in the area led to a merger with Thornbury High, with each becoming a campus of Thornbury Darebin Secondary College. This arrangement lasted until 1998 when the College was consolidated on the former Thornbury High site and the Clarendon Street campus was closed. It remained an education institution though, becoming home to both the Victorian School of Languages and the Distance Education Centre Victoria.

  • North Melbourne Primary School (Boundary Road)

    State School 2566 opened in 1883 on Boundary Road in a new red-brick building. Enrolments were high for most of its history, but doubled almost overnight when a nearby Housing Commission estate opened in 1967. To cope with the demand, in 1972 the Victorian Government determined that the existing buildings would be demolished to make way for a two-storey modern structure. This duly occurred, and the new building was opened in 1975. However, enrolments headed in the opposite direction, and the school was closed in the mid-1990s. The site was sold to make way for industrial facilities such as DTS Food Laboratories. Ironically, if the original building had survived it would have acquired heritage protection.

  • Norwood Primary School (Ringwood North)

    State School 4736 opened on the junction of Loughnan and Warrandyte Roads in 1956. By 1965 the school’s population was approaching 700, but dwindling enrolments led to its closure in 1993. The school was sold and became the new home of Ringwood Bowls Club in 1997.

  • Nunawading High School

    Nunawading High School opened on Canterbury Road (near Mahoneys Road) in 1955. Enrolments grew rapidly and by 1969 there were over 1,100 students, making it one of the largest schools in the state. In 1989 it was merged with Burwood Heights High and Blackburn South High to become a junior campus of Forest Hills Secondary College. However, the junior campuses were closed in 1997, and the former Nunawading High was bulldozed to make way for a housing estate.

  • Oakleigh High School

    Oakleigh High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1955, moving to new buildings in Highland Avenue the following year. The school was closed in 1992 with the major portion of the large site converted to a housing estate. The school hall was retained as a community facility (currently used by a Monash theatre group as storage) and renamed Fleigner Hall after the founding Head Master. Yet there is no plaque or acknowledgement of its history.

  • Oakleigh Technical School

    Oakleigh Technical School opened in a new red-brick building on the corner of Poath and North Roads in 1946. From 1968 gardening and horticulture apprenticeship classes were offered. This took on a new dimension in 1991 when the Technical School (by then known as Oakleigh Secondary College) was closed and became the Horticulture campus of Holmesglen College of TAFE. But this too was short-lived, as the site was sold in 1993 and the buildings demolished. Thereafter the landscape changed dramatically, to feature two housing estates, a service station, a McDonald’s restaurant, and Argyle Reserve.

  • Oak Park High School

    Oak Park High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1959, and moved into a new building on Plumpton Avenue the following year. Enrolments reached 990 by 1963 and then settled, only to decline markedly in the 1980s. Oak Park High was part of a short-lived merger in 1993, becoming a campus of Box Forest Secondary College along with Glenroy High, Fawkner Technical, Glenroy Technical and Hadfield High. However, by 1998 the school had been demolished to make way for a housing estate. Indeed, the only Box Forest Secondary campus to survive was the former Glenroy Technical School, further rebadged in 2010 as Glenroy College.

  • Overland Primary School (Keilor East)

    State School 5054 opened on Eastleigh Avenue in the early 1970s, on an allotment that originally extended to Sterling Drive. Within a few years the school boundaries were significantly contracted to make way for new housing (e.g. Westleigh Place). The school was closed altogether in 1993 to make way for another housing estate.

  • Parklands Primary School (Airport West)

    State School 4738 opened on a site bounded by Highlands Avenue, Parer Road and McNamara Avenue in 1958. Enrolments reached 710 by 1969, with many parents employed at nearby Essendon Airport. However, declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in the early 1990s. The site was cleared to make way for a housing estate.

  • Plenty Primary School

    State School 4093 opened in temporary accommodation in 1922, moving to a new building on Howell Road in 1924. A small, rural school for much of its history, it was closed in 1993. The site became the Plenty School of Health and Eastern Studies. One original school building is protected by a Nillumbik Shire Council heritage overlay.

  • Port Melbourne Primary School (Nott Street)

    Sandridge State School (SS1427) opened in a red-brick building on Nott Street in 1874. Soaring enrolments led to the opening of an annex in Graham Street in 1889. This arrangement lasted until 1908 when the schools were formally separated, with the two Port Melbourne primary schools being distinguished by their street names thereafter. Nott Street enrolments remained substantial for decades to come, sitting on 665 in 1969. Yet by 1992 enrolments had declined so markedly that the Nott Street school was ‘merged’ with Graham Street and closed. The heritage overlay protected buildings remained an education institution though, with the Port Phillip Specialist School relocating to the site in late 1996. Meanwhile, the Graham Street school is now formally known as Port Melbourne Primary School.

  • Port Welshpool Primary School

    State School 3375 opened in temporary accommodation in 1900 and moved to various sites around the town over the years. In 1957 the small school moved for the last time to a site on the corner of Stewart and Dobson Streets. It was closed in 1993 and the school demolished to make way for a private residence.

  • Portland High School

    Portland High School emerged from its Higher Elementary School origins in 1945. It remained on the Portland Primary site until moving to new buildings on Julia Street in 1956. Enrolments reached 800 by 1969, but declined thereafter. The early 1990s saw increased resource-sharing with Portland Technical, leading to formal amalgamation in 1993. The resultant Portland Secondary College was located on the Must Street site of the former Technical School. The High School was therefore closed, and eventually made way for the Portland Child and Family Complex.

  • Prahran High School

    Prahran High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1966, taking until 1969 to fully occupy its new building on the corner of Molesworth Street and Orrong Road. By 1968 enrolments had reached 700, but fell to 220 by 1996. This led to a ‘merger’ with Caulfield Secondary College to form Glen Eira College, and closure. The buildings were demolished and the land was converted to public open space through the expansion of Orrong Romanis Park.

  • Prahran Primary School

    State School 2855 opened as Prahran West in a new red-brick building in 1888. The name was changed to Prahran in 1925. New buildings were added in the early 1970s as the Gould League established its headquarters in the original building. Dwindling enrolments led to the closure of the school in 1990. The Gould League eventually moved out and the original building was converted into the luxury Stonnington Gardens Apartments.

  • Preston Technical School

    Preston Technical School opened in a Percy Everett designed building on St Georges Road in 1937. By 1951 it was the biggest technical school in Victoria with nearly 900 boys. A push for the inclusion of girls led to the construction of Preston Girls’ Technical School on nearby Cramer Street in 1956. Growth and expansion continued in the decades that followed. By 1990, Preston College of TAFE had become the dominant presence on the site, while the former technical schools had become Preston Secondary College. Then in 1994 Preston Secondary was ‘merged’ with Coburg High to form the short-lived Moreland City College (closed 2004). The original building is protected by a heritage overlay and is part of Melbourne Polytechnic.

  • Preston East High School

    Preston East High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1964, moving into its new Tyler Street building in 1966. Throughout its history special efforts were made to cater for the high proportion of students from low income families. In 1992 it was merged with Reservoir High and Kingsbury Technical to become a campus of Reservoir District Secondary College. However, dwindling enrolments led to the closure of the Preston East campus in 1997. The school was sold and reopened in 1998 as East Preston Islamic College, while some of the site became public open space.

  • Queenscliff High School

    Queenscliff Higher Elementary School opened in 1945 in temporary accommodation. Yet not until 1954 was the school able to occupy its permanent site at the junction of King Street and the Bellarine Highway. In 1957 it became a High School and enrolments steadily grew, reaching 390 by 1968. Population growth in the Bellarine Peninsula led to the opening of a Year 7 Annex in Ocean Grove in the mid-1980s. By 1995 the two sites had become campuses of a new entity: Bellarine Secondary College. However, the Queenscliff campus was closed in 1998 and the buildings demolished. Future use of the vacant site is now the subject of debate in the Borough of Queenscliffe.

  • Richards Street Primary School (Ballarat East)

    State School 4981 opened on Richards Street, near Wilson Street, in 1969. A major rationalisation of schools occurred in December 1993, when Richards Street was merged with three other schools to form Canadian Lead Primary (i.e. Golden Point, Eureka Street and Millbrook). The Richards Street and Eureka Street schools were retained as campuses until the new school building opened in 1997. The Richards Street site was then sold to make way for a housing estate.

  • Richmond Girls High School

    Opened in 1926 as Richmond Domestic Arts School in Gleadell Street. The building was eventually deemed unsafe and a new building was erected in 1954. It was renamed Richmond Girls High School in 1969. Closed in 1993, the school buildings are now part of Lynall Hall Community School. Some former students made their way to a new entity: Melbourne Girls’ College.

  • Richmond High School

    Richmond High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1967, moving to a new building on the Yarra Boulevard (near Bridge Road) in 1969. In 1988 it was merged with Richmond Technical to form the dual campus Richmond Secondary College. This was short-lived however, as the College was closed in 1992. A new entity, Melbourne Girls’ College, was opened on the site in 1994.

  • Richmond Technical School

    Richmond Technical School opened in 1926 on Church Street, behind the Richmond Town Hall. From the beginning the school specialised in training motor mechanics, and became integral to the growth of the automotive industry. In 1988 it was merged with Richmond High to form the dual campus Richmond Secondary College. This was short-lived however, as the College was closed in 1992. The Technical School site was cleared to make way for a police station and a McDonald’s restaurant.

  • Ringwood Primary School

    State School 2997 opened in 1874 and was located at various sites around Ringwood Railway Station until 1921. Students moved into a new brick building on Greenwood Avenue in 1922. Declining school enrolments in the Ringwood area led to the closure of several primary schools in 1997: Ringwood, Heathmont and Southwood. A new ‘merged’ entity – Great Ryrie Primary School – opened to replace them in 1998. The new school shared the Heathmont College senior campus (formerly Ringwood Technical). Having protected the Ringwood Primary site with a heritage overlay, Maroondah City Council acquired the school and grounds and converted them into the multi-purpose Maroondah Federation Estate.

  • Ringwood Technical School

    Ringwood Technical School had its origins in several temporary arrangements dating from 1957. In 1960 it moved to Heathmont Road, as the first co-educational technical school in Victoria. Enrolments neared 900 by 1969, and it was rebadged as Eastern Secondary College in 1990. In 1993 it amalgamated with Heathmont Secondary to form the dual campus Heathmont College. However, the Heathmont Road campus was VCE level only, and therefore the former Ringwood Technical could be considered closed. But the closure went one step further in 2003, when Heathmont College was consolidated on the Waters Grove site. The VCE campus was closed, with the site sub-divided to become Great Ryrie Primary School as well as a housing estate.

  • Ringwood East Primary School

    State School 4180 opened in a new red-brick building on Everard Road in 1924. Additional buildings were added over the years and student numbers had reached 574 by 1966. Dwindling enrolments led to the school’s closure in 1993, having ‘drawn the short straw’ with Eastwood Primary and Croydon West Primary. Education Department bureaucrats used this technique throughout Melbourne in the 1990s, to force a group of schools to decide which one was to close. The grounds of SS4180 became a housing estate, but the school building itself was protected by a heritage overlay. It survived to become the Maroondah Montessori Pre-School in 1996.

  • Rosebank Primary School (Reservoir)

    State School 4889 was known as Keon Park East when it opened in 1968 on a site bounded by Purinuan Road, Nutwood Street and Ramleh Road. In the mid-1970s the school was renamed Rosebank Primary, but declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in December 1992. The site was cleared to make way for a housing estate.

  • Rosehill Park Primary School (Keilor East)

    State School 4971 was known as Keilor South when it opened in 1968 on the corner of Groves Street and Quinn Grove. It was intended that the new school would relieve overcrowding at Keilor Heights Primary, and almost all the initial 265 students transferred accordingly. In 1988 Keilor South merged with nearby Lincolnville Primary to form Rosehill Park Primary, and Lincolnville was closed. This only lasted until late 1993 when Rosehill Park Primary was closed and sold off to make way for a housing estate. Ironically, most of the remaining students found their way to Keilor Heights Primary for the 1994 school year.

  • Rushworth Primary School

    State School 1057 opened in a red-brick classic in Heily Street in 1872 – one of the first ‘Henry Bastow Schools’ to be built. It became a Higher Elementary School in 1931 which continued until the establishment of Rushworth High in 1961. SS1057 reverted to being a Primary School and was moved to new buildings on Old Tatura Road the following year. The High School remained in the original Bastow premises, which acquired National Trust heritage listing in 1982. This made the choice of campus a simple matter when the schools were ‘merged’ to form Rushworth P-12 College in 1996. Rushworth Primary was closed and the site cleared.

  • Sale Technical School

    Sale Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1885, moving into dedicated space in the new Mechanics Institute (York Street) in 1891. At that time enrolments were 150, but had increased to 1,455 by 1967. This expansion was reflected in new buildings on Macalister Street (Boys school) in 1927 and the addition of a Girls school in 1930. Sale Technical was rebadged as Macalister Secondary College in the early 1990s, then ‘merged’ with Sale High (Gutheridge Street) to form the dual campus Sale College in 1996. But whereas the Gutheridge campus catered for Years 7 to 9, the Macalister campus was for Years 10 to 12 only. Therefore, Sale Technical can be considered closed.

  • Scoresby Heights Primary School

    State School 5089 opened on Zerfas Street in the early 1970s. Within a few years the site had been cleaved in two with the western half (i.e. Cavell Street) becoming Scoresby High School. In 1994, Scoresby Heights was ‘merged’ with Knoxfield Primary to form Carrington Primary. The school was closed and part of the site was absorbed by Scoresby High while the remainder became a housing estate. Today, Carrington Primary has only 113 students, which would have meant closure in the 1990s. We will watch its future with interest.

  • Sea Lake Primary School

    State School 3273 opened in temporary accommodation in 1896, moving into a new wooden building on the corner of Hannon and Mudge Streets in 1901. In 1994 it was ‘merged’ with Nandaly Primary, Berriwillock Primary and Sea Lake High to form Tyrrell P-12 College. The College was located in the Sutcliff Street buildings of the former High School and the three primary schools were closed. The former Sea Lake Primary site was cleared and remains barren.

  • Silvan South Primary School

    State School 4259 opened at the intersection of Monbulk-Seville and Link Roads in 1926. Always a small, rural school, it was an early casualty of the Kennett Government’s rationalisation policy. After its closure in 1992 the site was sold to private interests.

  • South Melbourne Primary School (Dorcas Street)

    State School 1253 opened in temporary accommodation in 1873, with its new building in Dorcas Street (near Ferrars Street) not ready for occupation until 1881. Although enrolments had been high for much of its history, they fell to 100 in 1996. The Charles Webb designed school was closed, and the heritage listed building was converted to luxury apartments. A Victorian Heritage Register plaque adorns the front entrance, providing residents and visitors with key features of its past.

  • South Melbourne Primary School (Eastern Road)

    State School 1852 opened in 1877 in a Henry Bastow designed building on the corner of Eastern Road and Napier Street. Further rooms were added at regular intervals over the following decades as enrolments soared. Declining enrolments led to the closure of the school in 1991, and the main building was converted to luxury apartments. New housing rose on the former playground.

  • South Melbourne Technical School

    South Melbourne Technical School opened in a new red-brick building on Albert Road in late 1918. This coincided with the end of the First World War, and rehabilitation training of returned soldiers was the school’s main function in the early years. In the late 1980s the school merged with Albert Park High to become the dual campus Hobson’s Bay Secondary College. However, declining enrolments led to the closure of the Albert Road campus a few years later, leaving the Graham Street campus to its own chequered future. By 1994 the former South Melbourne Technical site had become home to the Distance Education Centre. Today it is known as Sports House.

  • Southwood Primary School (Ringwood)

    State School 4857 opened on Maidstone Street in 1965. One can only wonder how the Cadbury factory next door affected student behaviour. Declining school enrolments in the Ringwood area led to the closure of several primary schools in 1997: Southwood, Heathmont and Ringwood. A new ‘merged’ entity – Great Ryrie Primary School – opened to replace them in 1998. The new school shared the Heathmont College senior campus (formerly Ringwood Technical). Tintern Grammar acquired the Southwood Primary site to open its boys’ campus in 1999.

  • Studfield Primary School

    State School 4920 opened in 1965 on a site bounded by Coleman Road, Bindi Street and Aisbett Avenue. Enrolments had reached 850 by 1971, but declined thereafter. In 1993 the school was closed following a ‘merger’ with Studfield East Primary to form Yawarra Primary School. The site was promptly cleared to make way for the Knox City housing estate. Yawarra was renamed Knox Central Primary in 2013.

  • Sunshine High School

    Sunshine High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1955, moving into a new building on the corner of Ballarat and Westmoreland Roads later that year. By 1959 enrolments exceeded 800. A major restructure of secondary schools occurred at the end of 1991 when six schools were amalgamated to form Sunshine College: Sunshine High, Tottenham Technical, Sunshine Technical, Ardeer High, Sunshine West High and Sunshine North Technical. The College operated from only four campuses, as Sunshine High and Tottenham Technical were closed. The Sunshine High site became a campus of Victoria University.

  • Sydenham Primary School

    State School 3559 opened on Keilor-Melton Road in 1911, closed later that year, and then reopened in 1914. Always a small, rural school, it was closed in the mid-1990s and the site cleared to make way for St John of God Accord – Brimbank Support Services.

  • Syndal High School

    Syndal High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1967, moving to a permanent site on Medina Road in 1969. By 1971 the site had been divided in two, with the western half (Medina Road) becoming Glendal Primary, with Syndal High in the eastern half (Rowitta Drive). The school was transformed into the junior campus of Glen Waverley Secondary College for 1995-96, and then closed. The site was sold to make way for a housing estate.

  • Syndal Primary School

    State School 4714 opened in temporary accommodation in 1953, moving to a new building on High Street Road (near Orchard Street) the following year. Declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in 1992. The site was sold to make way for a housing estate.

  • Syndal Technical School

    Syndal Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1958, moving into a new building on Lawrence Road the following year. By 1970 secondary enrolments had reached 600. In 1990 it was rebadged as Lawrence Secondary College, only to be closed in 1993. Most of the school site became a housing estate, although the gymnasium was retained and became Waverley Gymnastics Centre in 1996.

  • Templestowe High School

    Templestowe High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1960, moving to a new building on the corner of Manningham Road and Hazel Drive the following year. Enrolments had reached 1,050 by 1970. However, declining enrolments led to a ‘merger’ with Templestowe Technical to form Templestowe College, and the school was closed. The site was sold to make way for a housing estate.

  • Templestowe Primary School

    State School 1395 opened in a single-room brick building on Anderson Street in 1874. Additional buildings were added from the 1950s as enrolments took off, with 552 students by 1968. The school was closed in 1993 and acquired by Manningham City Council. The original brick building is protected by a heritage overlay, and today sits within the grounds of the Manningham Templestowe Leisure Centre.

  • Tottenham Primary School

    State School 4707 opened on Sunshine Road (near Sredna Street) in 1953. It was closed in the early 1990s and demolished. The vacant site could be described as a barren wasteland.

  • Tottenham Technical School

    Tottenham Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1957, moving to a permanent site in South Road, Braybrook the following year. By 1960 enrolments had reached 643. A major restructure of secondary schools occurred at the end of 1991 when six schools were amalgamated to form Sunshine College: Tottenham Technical, Sunshine High, Sunshine Technical, Ardeer High, Sunshine West High and Sunshine North Technical. The College operated from only four campuses, as Tottenham Technical and Sunshine High were closed. The Tottenham Technical site became the Tottenham English Language Centre, now a campus of the Western English Language School.

  • Traralgon Technical School

    Traralgon Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1960, moving to new buildings on Grey Street the following year. By 1970 enrolments had reached 560 boys, with additional buildings and grounds added. In 1993 it was ‘merged’ with Traralgon High (Shakespeare Street) to form the dual campus Traralgon Secondary College. But whereas the Shakespeare Street campus catered for Years 7 to 9, the Grey Street campus was for Years 10 to 12 only. Therefore, Traralgon Technical can be considered closed.

  • Victoria Park Primary School (Abbotsford)

    State School 2957 opened in Abbot Street in 1889, opposite the paddock that became home to Collingwood Football Club a few years later. The primary school produced several Collingwood champions over the years that followed. Declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in 1992. The site was sold and developed into a housing estate.

  • Wandin East Primary School

    State School 3934 opened in a wooden schoolroom on Old Baker Road, bordered by Massina Road, in 1916. Always a small, rural school, it was closed in 1991. Sold to private interests, it has recently been ‘restored to life’ as The Old School Cottages, offering self-contained accommodation in the refurbished buildings.

  • Wantirna Heights Primary School

    Wantirna Heights Primary School opened on Kingloch Parade in the early 1970s. It was closed in the late 1990s, and became the Wantirna Heights School, specialising in autism. In 2013 this school moved to Eastern Ranges School in Ferntree Gully and the buildings were boarded up. As at late 2016, the State Government is preparing the property for sale.

  • Warrandyte South Primary School

    State School 3476 opened in temporary accommodation in 1904, and the school moved to a building on Hall Road in 1907. The January 1939 bushfires destroyed the site and the school operated out of tents until a new building was completed later that year. The school was closed by 1995 and today is home to the inter-church youth organisation, Youth Dimension. The 1939 school building remains though, thanks to a heritage overlay applied by Manningham City Council.

  • Warrawong Primary School (Blackburn South)

    State School 4835 opened between Richmond Street and Hastings Avenue in 1960. Enrolments had reached 622 by 1968. In the late 1980s a major amalgamation took place in the area, when Warrawong, Killoura, Blackburn South and Mirrabooka primary schools were merged to form the triple campus Orchard Grove Primary. Blackburn South was closed in the process. The arrangement proved to be short-lived however, with only the former Mirrabooka Primary surviving past 1991. Warrawong Primary was demolished to make way for a housing estate.

  • Watsonia High School

    Watsonia High School opened in temporary accommodation in 1962, moving into its new building on the corner of Nepean Street and Sainsbury Avenue the following year. By 1969 enrolments had soared to 1,075, and the school boasted its own swimming pool. In 1990 it merged with Watsonia Technical to become the dual campus Greensborough Secondary College. However, this only lasted until 1992, when the Nepean Street campus was closed, leaving the Nell Street campus to become Greensborough College. While most of the former Watsonia High site became a housing estate, the swimming pool survives as Yarra Swim School. Greensborough Bowling Club was also established on the site.

  • Watsonia South Primary School

    State School 5024 opened in 1971, on a site bounded by Frensham Road, Gabonia Avenue, Illoura Street and Webster Crescent. Declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in 1993. The site was sold to make way for a housing estate.

  • Wattle Park High School

    Wattle Park High School opened beside Wattle Park Golf Course in 1962. It was rebadged as a Secondary College in 1990, but declining enrolments saw it closed in 1992. The idyllic setting made the site irresistible to developers and a housing estate rose in its place.

  • Waverley High School

    Holmesglen High School opened in temporary accommodation in February 1956, and had its name changed twice by March: Jordanville High and finally Waverley High. Late that year the school moved into its new building on the corner of Waverley and Huntingdale Roads. By the time it was rebadged as a Secondary College in 1990 enrolments were in decline. The school was closed a few years later and developed into a housing estate.

  • Waverley North Primary School

    State School 4884 opened on Stephensons Road in 1962, and enrolments reached 900 by 1967. In 1993 the school was ‘merged’ with Syndal North Primary to form Mount Waverley North Primary and the Stephensons Road school was closed. The site was then acquired by neighbouring Mount Waverley Secondary College for its junior campus.

  • Waverley Park Primary School (Mulgrave)

    Waverley Park Primary School opened on the corner of Hansworth Street and Grovelands Drive in 1973. Enrolments had declined to 162 in 1996 which led to the school’s closure. It was demolished to make way for a housing estate.

  • Wedderburn Primary School

    State School 794 opened in temporary accommodation in 1865, moving to a permanent site on the corner of Wilson and Chapel Streets in 1868. New brick buildings were added in 1908, and it was proclaimed a Higher Elementary School in 1941. However, it reverted to a primary school when Wedderburn High was opened in 1961. Then in December 1999 Wedderburn Primary was ‘merged’ with Korong Vale Primary and Wedderburn High to form Wedderburn P-12 College. The new entity was located on the High School site and the other schools were closed. Loddon Shire purchased the historic Wedderburn Primary buildings and established Wedderburn Community Centre in 2005.

  • Wellington Primary School (Mulgrave)

    State School 4847 opened on Shaftsbury Drive in 1968. By 1972 enrolments had risen to 640, yet by 1996 had fallen to 163. This led to the school being ‘merged’ with Brandon Park Primary and closed. It was demolished to make way for a housing estate.

  • Werribee South Primary School (Duncans Road)

    Werribee Estate State School (SS3193) opened on Duncans Road in 1915, bounded by the Maimones Road irrigation channel. The name was changed to Werribee South in 1928. Declining enrolments led to the school’s closure in 1993. The school building was demolished after the site was sold to private interests.

  • West Melbourne Primary School

    State School 1689 opened on King Street in 1875 in a Terry and Oakden (Architects) designed building. Enrolments were substantial for much of its history, but declined markedly in the late 20th century to the extent that the school was closed in 1992. The building has National Trust heritage protection, being a striking example of school design from the Henry Bastow era. The Salvation Army acquired the site in the late 1990s and it became their Flagstaff Crisis Accommodation centre.

  • Whiteside Primary School (Springvale)

    State School 4785 opened in 1957 in a new building located between Lewis and Birch Streets. Declining enrolments led to a ‘merger’ with Sandown Park Primary in the mid-1990s to form Springvale Heights Primary. The school was closed and became a campus of Minaret College in 1996. As for Springvale Heights Primary, it is now a campus of Springvale Rise Primary School.

  • Windsor Technical School

    Prahran Technical School underwent a series of transformations in the 1970s-80s. After the original High Street campus became a tertiary institution, the Union Street campus and the Hornby Street campus were rebadged as Windsor Technical School in 1980. Then the Union Street campus was closed, leaving only the Hornby Street site (originally the Girls School) by 1988. The remaining campus then merged with Ardoch High to become the dual campus Ardoch-Windsor Secondary College. However, this only lasted until 1992, when the Ardoch campus was closed and students relocated to the Windsor campus. The final chapter occurred in the mid-1990s when the Hornby Street school was closed to make way for a housing estate.

  • Wonthaggi Technical School

    Wonthaggi Technical School opened in 1922 on the corner of McBride Avenue and Watt Street. Enrolments at the co-educational school reached 746 in 1964, with several new buildings added over the years. In the 1990s it was ‘merged’ with Wonthaggi High (Dudley Road) to form the dual campus Wonthaggi Secondary College. But whereas the Dudley campus catered for Years 7 to 9, the McBride campus was for Years 10 to 12 only. Therefore, Wonthaggi Technical can be considered closed.

  • Yallourn Technical School

    Yallourn Technical School opened in temporary accommodation in 1928, moving to a new building at the corner of Railway and Latrobe Avenues in 1936. Enrolments reached 1,547 in 1958, the year after the School was moved to a new site on John Field Drive, East Newborough. Declining enrolments in the area led to the amalgamation of Yallourn Technical, Moe High and Newborough High in 1994 to form Lowanna College. Initially there were three campuses, with the former Yallourn Technical being the senior campus, while the former High Schools were junior campuses. By 2000 they had been consolidated on a new site in Newark Avenue and the original schools closed. The former Yallourn Technical site was acquired by the TAFE sector and is today a campus of Federation Training.

  • Yanakie Primary School

    State School 4842 opened on Millar Road in 1960, to cater for the families of a Soldier Settlement Scheme. The initial enrolment of 30 had increased to 60 by 1967. A portable classroom was added in 1980, but enrolments declined thereafter. The school was closed in 1993 and the remaining students transferred to Foster Primary. The portable classroom went with them, and is now a feature exhibit at the Foster Museum.

  • Yarraleen Primary School (Bulleen)

    State School 5051 opened on Balwyn Road (near Thompsons Road) in the early 1970s. In 1990, Education Minister Joan Kirner visited the school to launch an Arts program. But the school was closed a few years later and the site became a housing estate.

  • Yarra Park Primary School (East Melbourne)

    State School 1406 opened in 1874 on the corner of Punt Road and Wellington Parade. The following year saw enrolments increase to over 1,000. The Charles Webb designed school was closed in 1992, and the heritage listed building was converted to prestige apartments.